HCTV Programs

Henrico County Television (HCTV) programming is available through Comcast’s Video On Demand service. To access HCTV programs, select the “Get Local” folder, followed by “Government,” and finally “Access Henrico.” Video On Demand allows our Comcast cable subscribers to choose which HCTV program they want to watch and when they want to watch it. Approximately 25 programs are available at one time. We change the program line-up monthly.

You may also request a DVD of an HCTV program by calling Public Relations & Media Services at 501-4257.

Airwaves of Yesteryear: Early Television in Central Virginia
On April 22, 1948 the very first television broadcast south of our nation's capital happened right here in Central Virginia. WTVR began a legacy of quality local programming, which was soon followed by WXEX and WRVA. These early television pioneers brought us local favorites including Dandy Doodle, Sailor Bob and Shock Theatre. Join HCTV as we celebrate more than 60 years of community programming and look at how this new form of entertainment changed our lives forever in  Airwaves of Yesteryear: Early Television in Central Virginia.
Community & Social IssuesHistory
201130 minutes
All Aboard! The History of the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad
The Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad was the sixth railroad to be chartered in the commonwealth, receiving exclusive rights from the General Assembly to connect Richmond and Fredericksburg to the Potomac River steamboat lines. RF&P played a key role in the Civil War and World War II, after which it modernized from steam engines to diesel locomotives. Over the course of its 157-year history the company acquired significant amounts of property along its route, including a number of acres in Henrico County — land that is now home to Glen Allen Stadium at RF&P Park. Though its trains no longer run through the heart of Virginia, the RF&P remains embedded in the history of the communities it touched and in the imagination of the people it served.
201627 minutes
Armour House and Gardens at Meadowview Park, The
Built between 1915 and 1918, the Armour House and Gardens at Meadowview Park is a sprawling 600-acre retreat boasting a scenic walking trail, tennis courts, children's play areas, gardens and a flowing fountain surrounded by arbors with blooming vines. Join HCTV as we document the rich Henrico history of the Victorian style home and Meadowview Park with rare photographs and interviews chronicling the property's intriguing past.
RetiredArchitectureHistoryNotable Places
200820 minutes
Between the Lines: How Reconstruction Redrew the Map of Henrico
You may know which magisterial district you live in, but do you know how that district came to be, or why its boundaries are where they are? The reasons are far more interesting and complex than you may think. Our districts and our Board of Supervisors structure of governance can trace their roots back to the turbulent years following the Civil War, known as the Reconstruction Period, and havebeen evolving with the times ever since.
201222 minutes
Boston: The Story of a Racehorse
In the realm of horseracing greats, one thoroughbred from Virginia stands out: Secretariat. In 1973, as a 3-year-old, he won horse racing's Triple Crown — breaking the track record at all three events. But more than a century before Secretariat rewrote the record book, another stallion from central Virginia became known far and wide for his speed, stamina — and vicious temperament. This horse — born in Henrico County and named Boston — is part of an ancestral line that produced Secretariat and other notable horses. Join HCTV as we look into his life, victories and defeats in Boston: The Story of a Racehorse.
201620 minutes
By George! The Henry Ward Story
Ward Elementary School stands along Darbytown Road in Henrico County's rural Varina area. The school takes its name from Henry Ward, a compassionate, down-to-earth family man who helped spark the educations of a generation of local children. In and out of the classroom, Ward demonstrated an ability to lead and inspire. Nine years after Ward's death, the Henrico School Board honored his years of service to the community by naming a new school after him. Join HCTV as we explore his life and legacy in By George: The Story of Henry Ward.
201618 minutes
Cashell Donahoe: A Gentleman and a Scholar
Cashell Donahoe left an indelible mark on Henrico County, having served as assistant superintendent of schools from 1956 until 1974. But Donahoe was more than a teacher and an administrator. He was a mountain of a man, with an abiding faith, a commitment to others and a thirst for knowledge. Join HCTV as we examine the life of Cashell Donahoe: A Gentleman and a Scholar.
201518 minutes
Central Virginia Biographies: Elizabeth Adam Crump
Born in 1891, Elizabeth Young Adam grew up in Richmond, and moved to Henrico in 1922, when she married her longtime beau, Sheppard Crump. They lived at Meadow Farm, where Elizabeth continued to live after her husband's death in 1960. She devoted her life to volunteering and philanthropic activities, and was esteemed throughout the community. Following her husband's wishes, she donated two parcels of land to Henrico County for today's Meadow Farm Museum and the Crump Manor nursing home, where she spent the last years of her life. Join HCTV as we learn more about this fascinating lady in Central Virginia Biographies: Elizabeth Adam Crump.
201119 minutes
City Limits: Henrico Escapes Richmond's Attempts to Merge and Annex
When Henrico County's population began to explode in the late 1950s and early 1960s, the City of Richmond attempted to acquire the county through a merger or "consolidation." Henrico's citizens flatly voted against the takeover attempt. Undeterred, the city then filed for a 142-square-mile annexation of the county"–an astonishing 60 percent of the county's land mass"–in a courtroom battle that lasted several years. Learn how narrowly escaping these bold attempts has defined and shaped the present and future of Henrico, in City Limits.
Community & Social IssuesHistory
200919 minutes
Community's Spirit: Historic Tales of Highland Springs, A
Highland Springs was founded in 1890 as one of Henrico's first suburbs. Named for its high elevation and natural springs, the little unincorporated town became a hub of activity and community spirit. Hear from residents and high school alumni as they tell the tales of how Highland Springs came to be the unique community it is today.
RetiredHistoryNotable Places
200825 minutes
Connecting Communities: The Bridges of Henrico
The Huguenot, Willey, Varina-Enon and Pocahontas Parkway bridges keep our communities connected, spur commerce and growth, and serve as icons or symbols of the county. These four modern marvels of engineering science serve as gateways to Henrico, and are vital to the 21st century transportation network that moves the county and the region.
ArchitectureHistoryNotable Places
201516 minutes
Curtain Call: A History of the Henrico Theatre
When it opened its doors in 1938, the Henrico Theatre was described as a "big city temple of entertainment set in beautiful rural surroundings." A classic example of art-deco architecture, the theatre was the crown jewel of Highland Springs. After years of successes and changes of ownership, the Henrico Theatre closed its doors— until Henrico County purchased the property in 1999. Join HCTV as we reveal the story behind the theatre, follow the extensive renovation process and learn how it has become a historic landmark in the county.
ArchitectureHistoryNotable Places
201325 minutes
Day in the Life: A Reenactment of the Battle at New Market Heights, A
On September 29, 1864, on fields south of New Market Road, African-American soldiers serving in the U.S. Colored Troops led an assault against Richmond's outer ring of defenses. One-hundred fifty years later, Henrico County brought the day back to life. More than 100 acres of Henrico farmland were transformed into the New Market Heights battlefield. Nearly 1,000 reenactors traveled from around the country to recreate the battle of New Market Heights. Watch how Henrico County bears witness — both then and now — to a significant moment in American history.
201421 minutes
Desegregation: Stories of Integration of Henrico Public Schools
The Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s brought seismic change to American society. Perhaps the greatest impact was felt in education. The U.S. Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown vs. the Board of Education ordered that racial segregation in schools gave unequal treatment to blacks and whites, and was unconstitutional. The decision meant school systems would have to integrate. In Henrico County, the process of school desegregation occurred gradually from 1963 to 1969. Join HCTV as we hear the stories and learn the history of this revolution in education.
Community & Social IssuesHistory
201828 minutes
Douglas Southall Freeman: Voice of the Confederate Soldier
From a very early age, Douglas Southall Freeman dedicated himself to accurately recording the story of the Army of Northern Virginia and Robert E. Lee. His meticulous research methods and commitment to his work established him as a nationally known newspaper editor, radio commentator, military expert and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian. Join HCTV in this edition of Central Virginia Biographies as we explore what inspired and motivated Dr. Douglas Southall Freeman: Voice of the Confederate Soldier.
201038 minutes
Dr. John Mosby Sheppard of Meadow Farm 1817-1877
Dr. John Mosby Sheppard of Meadow Farm was a country doctor and farmer during the 19th century"–a very tumultuous time in Henrico County. Join HCTV as we shed light on Dr. Sheppard, take a glimpse into his medical practice, economic status and the Sheppard family's life during the mid-1800s.
200931 minutes
Dr. Richard Archibald Patterson: A Self-Made Man
Henrico residents probably recognize the name Patterson as one of the roads they often drive. The road's namesake, however, is likely an afterthought. Dr. Richard Archibald Patterson was a giant of his time — a tobacco pioneer who helped forge his community's recovery from the Civil War; a public servant and philanthropist; a doctor and Civil War surgeon; and a proud Henrico resident who envisioned big things for his community. Join HCTV as we uncover the story of the man, his era and the community he served.
201326 minutes
Dr. William C. Bosher Jr.: The Man Behind the Bow Tie
William Cleveland Bosher Junior was born January 21, 1946 in Richmond, and spent his childhood on his family's small farm in Hanover County. He landed his first teaching job in 1968 at Henrico's J.R. Tucker High School at the age of 22, eventually becoming Superintendent of Schools for Henrico County, Chesterfield County, and the Commonwealth of Virginia. He influenced the education of countless children and was known for his educational expertise nationally and internationally — as well as his trademark bow tie. His legacy is in the lives he touched and the spirit of hope he cultivated everywhere he went. Join HCTV as we experience his extraordinary life in Dr. William C. Bosher, Jr.: The Man Behind the Bow Tie.
201735 minutes
E Pluribus Unum: The Changing Face Of Henrico County
For centuries, Henrico County has been a destination for people seeking a better life. From the natives who first settled thousands of years ago and the English colonists of the 17th century, to refugees from war-torn countries in the Balkans, Asia, and Africa, our county has become a mosaic of cultures, and a microcosm of the world's peoples. Join HCTV for a colorful glimpse into what brings people here from far and wide.
RetiredCommunity & Social IssuesHistory
201129 minutes
Edward A. Beck: Manager, Leader, Visionary
Edward A. Beck, Henrico's fourth county manager, led Henrico for a quarter of a century during times of significant growth. Beck drew upon his unique skills as a civil engineer to guide the county through a period of transition following World War II. His vision resulted in the vastly different, modernized Henrico that we know today. Join HCTV as we explore Beck's life, his leadership style and the legacy he left behind.
201523 minutes
Elizabeth Jane Holladay: Trailblazer of Public Education
Henrico County Public Schools is widely recognized as one of the nation's premier school systems, but this modern model of excellence comes from humble beginnings. One cornerstone was laid in the late 19th century, in the parlor of a home on Mountain Road, where a dedicated teacher began sharing her love of learning with a handful of children from the nearby farms. By the time she was done, Elizabeth Jane Holladay had helped build a foundation for public education in Henrico. Students today continue to learn under her watchful eye — at Holladay Elementary School in central Henrico, just a couple miles from her original classroom. Join HCTV as we learn about Miss Lizzie, her life and her dedication to education.
201415 minutes
Elko Files: History & Mystery in Eastern Henrico, The
The Elko tract in eastern Henrico County is a place where you can't always believe what you see. It's also a place of purpose, reinvention and promise. What remains today has been called a "lost city," and much has been speculated about its past. The Elko name marks a middle school and a community center, and with land for further development, the tract remains a vital part of Henrico's plan for the future. Join HCTV as we explore the mysteries and misunderstandings of the Elko Files.
HistoryNotable Places
201721 minutes
Evolving Legend: The Story of Robert E. Lee, An
The mere mention of Robert E. Lee conjures up the image of a gray-haired, gray-bearded, gray-suited Confederate General, forever trapped in an 1865 photograph or in a bronze and stone monument. In reality, the Civil War was only four years of his multifaceted, fascinating life, and he was infinitely more complex than the icon he has become. In death, Robert E. Lee still commands attention. He will inevitably fascinate and divide opinion as long as his story continues to unfold. Join HCTV as we explore the controversial figure in An Evolving Legend: The Story of Robert E. Lee.
201338 minutes
First Pitch: History of the Tuckahoe Little League, The
In the late 1950s baseball became America's favorite pastime, and it was every young boy's dream to play the game. For the kids in Henrico, there was no organized league that would allow them to play—until a group of fathers joined forces to form the Tuckahoe Little League. Through the years, the league has prospered and multiple generations of boys and girls have experienced baseball and softball on first-class fields. The tradition continues today, and HCTV takes you back to those glory years in The First Pitch: History of the Tuckahoe Little League.
201518 minutes
For Family and Community: The Life of William Leroy Vandervall
William Vandervall was born in Richmond in 1860 to free black parents Leroy P. and Rebecca Vandervall. After the Civil War, the family saw opportunities beyond Richmond, and settled in an area of western Henrico known as Rio Vista. The family’s commitment to education proved profound. William advocated for educational equality for black students, worked as a teacher for 20 years and was the first African-American mail carrier in the area. His family’s land was used for a church and two schools located on Quioccasin Road. Vandervall died on October 10th, 1934, at age 74. He left a legacy of service to his community and to Henrico County.
201720 minutes
Forging Freedom: The Story of Gabriel's Rebellion
Were it not for a typical late summer storm in Central Virginia, the events planned for August 30, 1800 might have changed the history of our country forever. A slave named Gabriel, owned by Thomas Henry Prosser of Brookfield plantation, conceived and organized a widespread slave uprising. Involving several Virginia localities, it was possibly the most far-reaching slave uprising planned in the history of the South. The plan might have succeeded had it not been for a sudden, severe downpour and the disclosure of the plot by several slaves, including Tom and Pharoah, who belonged to Mosby Sheppard of Meadow Farm. The alarm went out and the rebellion was thwarted. The effects of the conspiracy were profound and as a result, county and state leaders instituted legislation to regulate the movement of slaves and free blacks. Join HCTV as we tell the story of Gabriel and the failed insurrection in Forging Freedom: The Story of Gabriel's Rebellion.
201629 minutes
Four Centuries of Conflict and Confusion: The History of Dutch Gap
The history of Dutch Gap and the people who lived there spans four centuries of conflict and confusion. The Dutch Gap canal, located on the James River near the 17th-century Citie of Henricus, was originally constructed during the Civil War to shortcut the seven-mile loop around Farrar's Island. Join HCTV as we learn about Dutch Gap, how it got its name, and the many wars and battles fought throughout its history.
HistoryNature & ScienceNotable Places
201322 minutes
From Shoe Man to Supervisor: Robert Coleman Longan (1885-1960) 
Robert C. Longan left an indelible mark across Henrico despite the limits of his own education. Longan grew up on his family's farm in rural Louisa County, before moving to Richmond where he married and became a successful businessman. In 1920, he opened Longan's Family Shoe Store downtown at Fifth and Broad, and in 1943 was elected to represent the Tuckahoe District on the Henrico Board of Supervisors. Longan retired from the board on December 31, 1959, and died from a heart attack the very next day. He left such a mark on Henrico that community leaders thought of him in 1964, when a new elementary school was being planned off West End Drive. R.C. Longan Elementary was dedicated two years later, in 1966.
201619 minutes
From the Mines of Henrico: The Beginnings of Our Nation's Coal Industry
Coal has been used as an energy source worldwide for thousands of years. In the United States, the coal industry originated on the banks of the James River and mines right here in Henrico County. Join HCTV as we document the industry's rise and fall, and see what remains today of Henrico's often overlooked coal history.
HistoryNotable Places
201721 minutes
Frozen in Time: The Ruins of the James River Steam Brewery
The arched cellar entrance of David Yuengling Junior's once mighty James River Steam Brewery is a portal to an amazing tale that lies buried in a Rocketts Landing hillside, nearly forgotten for a century. The mysterious facade bears no trace of the famous name or the tumultuous times during which an American staple, lager beer, was produced on a massive scale right here in Henrico County. Join HCTV for a journey into the cellars and back in time.
ArchitectureHistoryNotable Places
201423 minutes
George Henry Moody: A Man to Remember, A Name to Honor
George Henry Moody held the office of superintendent for 13 of his 38 years with Henrico County Schools, and was honored and lauded in countless ways. He was a humble man, from humble beginnings, and is worthy of remembrance for leaving an indelible mark as an educator, a leader, and as a humanitarian in Henrico County. Join HCTV as we explore the man for whom Moody Middle School was named in George Henry Moody: A Man to Remember, A Name to Honor.
201121 minutes
Giving Thanks: The History & Origins of Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving is celebrated all over the country. When we gather around the table to share a meal with family and friends, do we ever think about how the holiday began? Traditions dating back hundreds of years are still honored today, from turkey and stuffing to parades and football. Join HCTV as we explore the origins of one of America's most cherished holidays.
Community & Social IssuesHistory
201522 minutes
Great War Remembered: Henrico's Story of Service & Support, The
On April 6, 1917, the United States formally entered what would eventually come to be known as World War I. Every aspect of our society was affected. The citizens of Henrico County contributed their money, food, energy, and lives to the war effort. Henrico was also the site of a munitions plant staffed by patriotic women in what is now Sandston. Although millions died in combat or from disease, few reminders of the conflict exist today. Through archival film, posters, photographs, and the wartime letters of Meadow Farm's Sheppard Crump, HCTV takes you back to the forgotten war.
201031 minutes
Henrico Statesman: Charles M. Johnson (1919-1981)
Charles Monroe Johnson didn't intend to shape the future of Henrico County when he settled near Bethlehem Road after World War II. As a young husband and father, he wanted simply to live in a strong, vibrant community. Today, Charles M. Johnson Elementary School stands as a testament to one man's willingness to step up, to volunteer and to devote himself to his community. Join HCTV as we talk to family members, friends and colleagues who share their stories of a true Henrico Statesman.
201620 minutes
Henrico's Iron: Ironclad Battles on the James River
The James River in eastern Henrico County serves as a watery grave for three mighty ships from the Civil War. Today, the CSS Richmond, Virginia II and Fredericksburg remain casualties from the James River Squadron and footnotes to America's struggle to unite its North and South. But during the War, they marked an advanced breed of armored ship. They were Ironclads that forever changed naval combat. HCTV uncovers the untold story of Henrico's maritime combats during the Civil War in Henrico's Iron: Ironclad Battles on the James River.
201325 minutes
Henrico's Legacy: Commemorating 400 Years
In 1611, the "city or "town" of Henrico, was established as the second settlement of Virginia. By 1634, Henrico, named for the king's eldest son Henry, Prince of Wales, would become one of the eight original shires of Virginia. As we celebrate the 400th anniversary of Henrico County, we embrace the history that made us what we are today. Join HCTV as we explore Henrico's long journey of survival, independence and discovery, and learn about the people and events that shaped the county along the way in Henrico's Legacy: Commemorating 400 Years.
201153 minutes
Henrico's View of the James River and Kanawha Canal
The mighty James flows through Henrico County like a great provider of wealth and opportunity. Early settlers in the new world saw that shipping goods and services along its waterways would be beneficial. This is a story of triumph and tragedies as we look at historic Henrico experiences along the James River and Kanawha Canal.
ArchitectureHistoryNotable Places
200921 minutes
Hidden History: The Story of East End Cemetery
On the brightest of days, sunlight finds a way to cut through the canopies of mature trees at East End Cemetery in Henrico County. Don't be misled by the heavy undergrowth and tangles of vines — this is sacred ground, the final resting place for thousands of African-Americans from the turn of the 20th century. Join HCTV as we gain insight into the cemetery's rich cultural history, and learn how the land is slowly being reclaimed by volunteers determined to uncover East End's secrets.
Community & Social IssuesHistoryNotable Places
201721 minutes
Historic Henrico Churches: Windows to Our Past
The story of Henrico's historic churches began in 1611 when Sir Thomas Dale established a settlement on the edge of the western frontier. From those early days at Henricus to today's ever-changing communities, historic churches are the windows to our past. Join HCTV as we explore the culture, heritage, and architecture of these celebrated places of worship.
RetiredArchitectureHistoryNotable Places
201028 minutes
History of Gravel Hill, The
Gravel Hill sits tucked away in eastern Henrico County, bearing only humble monuments to its extraordinary history. Among the rustic surroundings are a scattering of modest homes, a small church and an old school building. The community dates back to 1771, and has persevered against the odds due to grit, determination, self-reliance and pride. Join HCTV as we tell this remarkable story of one of the first African-American communities in the nation.
HistoryNotable Places
201616 minutes
History of New Market Road: Connecting the Past to the Future, The
New Market Road, part of the Route 5 corridor in eastern Henrico, is one of Virginia’s most historically significant roads. Native Americans, war veterans, local farmers and artisans travelled this byway during times of war and peace, creating history along the way. Join HCTV as we explore the times gone by in The History of New Market Road: Connecting the Past to the Future.
201717 minutes
History of Recreation and Parks, The
For more than four decades, Henrico's Division of Recreation and Parks has been committed to helping residents pursue good health and good times. With more than 4 million park visitors each year, the division has embraced the responsibility of caring for more than 3,600 acres of parkland, 140 recreational buildings and 35 historic sites. But the Division of Recreation & Parks had humble beginnings, with a few recreational activities organized at local schools. Join HCTV as we learn about the history of Recreation & Parks, and how the division has grown to serve the residents of Henrico.
RetiredHenrico Departments & ServicesHistoryRecreation
201322 minutes
Hometown Hero: Arthur Ashe, Jr.
Arthur Ashe, Jr. is known worldwide as a tennis champion, an advocate for education and for his tragic death due to AIDS-related pneumonia as a result of a blood transfusion. Ashe's legacy and his ties to Central Virginia are further cemented in the Henrico County public school that bears his name, Arthur Ashe, Jr. Elementary. Join HCTV as we explore the man behind the tennis racket, and learn about how he used his notoriety to help the people of Richmond, especially children.
201428 minutes
Jackson Davis: Catalyst for Educational Equality
Jackson Davis made his name as an education reformer. He travelled with his camera, taking thousands of photographs documenting the often-poor condition of African-American education in the South during the first half of the 20th century. These stark images and Davis' meticulous notes helped attract private investment that gradually lifted rural communities still suffering from the Civil War. While his service to Henrico lasted only a few years, Davis' legacy continues. In 1962, the School Board opened Jackson Davis Elementary honoring the catalyst for educational equality.
201622 minutes
JEB Stuart: Bold Cavalier
To southerners, James Ewell Brown Stuart is best known as the "Bold Cavalier" of the Confederate Cavalry during the American Civil War, and as Robert E. Lee's go-to intelligence man. Join HCTV as we follow J.E.B. Stuart's journey from his boyhood in Ararat, Virginia; his cadet years at West Point; his encounter with abolitionist John Brown at Harpers Ferry; and finally, to his mortal wounding at the Battle of Yellow Tavern in Henrico County.
201335 minutes
John Marshall: In the Opinion of the Court
Chief Justice John Marshall helped shape the future of our nation. From his humble beginnings on the Virginia frontier, Marshall served his country in the American Revolutionary War, became a prominent and respected politician, and served for 34 years as Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. His wisdom, patriotism, and judicial expertise set an example of justice for the world to follow. Learn how Marshall's leadership cemented the role of the Supreme Court as the Law of the Land in this Central Virginia Biography, John Marshall: In the Opinion of the Court.
201029 minutes
John Randolph Tucker: A Heritage of Law
The Tucker name has a legacy of great lawyers and law educators in Virginia dating back to our country's beginning. John Randolph Tucker continued the family heritage and became a highly respected law practitioner and educator just as his ancestors before him. But it was because of his firm belief in civic betterment that he fought for Henrico County to have its own professional government that gave Tucker a legacy all his own.
201117 minutes
Larger than Life: Captain John Cussons
With a life that spanned from his native England to the American frontier and ultimately Henrico County, John Cussons left us with a colorful image of his spirited adventures and brash personality. But what do we really know about him? Is it possible to separate the truth from the fiction? The man from the legend? Join HCTV as we learn about the fearless pioneer in Larger than Life: Captain John Cussons (1838-1912).
201423 minutes
Lewis Ginter: A Quiet Contribution
Lewis Ginter is probably best known in our area for the botanical garden bearing his name. Located in Henrico County, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is but one of the many contributions Ginter made to the Metro Richmond area with the help of his niece, Grace Arents. Although Metro Richmond was a home Ginter adopted, he profoundly changed the landscape and quality of life through his fascinating and diverse business ventures.
200831 minutes
Mills E. Godwin: Virginia's Statesman
Mills Edwin Godwin, Jr., known as Virginia's Education Governor, was born November 19, 1914 in Nansemond County, Virginia (now the City of Suffolk). During his two terms as governor, Godwin championed the community college system in Virginia, was a key player in the Civil Rights Movement, and implemented the sales tax in the Commonwealth. Godwin remains the only governor in the country who was elected and served his first term as a democrat, and his second as a republican. Join HCTV as we learn more about Godwin through the stories of people who knew him best.
201030 minutes
MONEY: The Evolution of Currency in America
Is there anything more American than the dollar bill? Today it is instantly recognized around the world and universally accepted as payment for just about anything. But American currency traveled a long and colorful course over several centuries before it became the global force we know today. Its development is intertwined with the nation's history, and its evolution continues. Join HCTV as we explore the progressive phases of our legal tender in MONEY: The Evolution of Currency in America.
201625 minutes
Monticello: Thomas Jefferson's Dream
Thomas Jefferson's dream was to build a home in the mountains of Virginia. Throughout the years, his many experiences gave him a wealth of knowledge to make this dream come true. Monticello not only reflects Jefferson's many interests, but also embodies the spirit of all the people who lived and worked to make this home one of the most famous man-made wonders of Virginia.
ArchitectureBiographyHistoryNotable Places
200825 minutes
Mother Maybelle & The Carter Sisters: The Henrico Years
The lilting music of the Carter family sprang from the hills of Southwest Virginia, but it flowered in Henrico County. For about six years during the 1940s, Maybelle Carter and her young daughters "– Helen, June and Anita "– set roots in Central Virginia. In 1946, they saw their popularity explode when they landed a spot with Richmond's biggest station "– WRVA "– and its premier stage for hillbilly fun. The family moved to Henrico in 1947, buying a two-story home on what used to be Mountain Road. Join HCTV as we talk to former friends, classmates and fans to learn about Mother Maybelle and the Carter Sisters during their Henrico years.
201229 minutes
On the Green: Belmont Golf Course
Henrico County's Belmont Golf Course was first established in 1917 as Hermitage Country Club on Hilliard Road. The golf course hosted such prestigious events as the Valentine Invitational, The Richmond Open, and the 1949 PGA Championship. Henrico purchased the property in 1977 and named the golf course Belmont. The 18-hole course is open to the public, and is one of the area's finest recreational venues. Join HCTV as we meet the golfers and explore the history, fun and challenges of the course in On the Green: Belmont Golf Course.
ArchitectureHenrico Departments & ServicesHistoryRecreation
201225 minutes
Open Road: The Interstate Highways in Henrico County, The
The National System of Interstate and Defense Highways united the far corners of the nation, changing lives and landscapes along the way. While their existence is largely taken for granted, they remain the most ambitious public works project in American history. More than one thousand miles of the network was allocated for Virginia in the 1956 plan. Henrico County benefitted from three components: I-95, I-64 and I-295. Together, they formed the framework for Henrico's future growth. Join HCTV for a revealing road trip that connects past and present.
201622 minutes
Opportunity to Reform: The Laurel Industrial School and the History of Juvenile Corrections in Henrico, An
Few people traveling through Laurel on Hungary Road seem to notice that they're in one of the county's historic districts, or that they're passing through the site of the state's first reformatory. HCTV takes an investigative journey into the dramatic and complex history of the Laurel Industrial School, examines its legacy, and sheds light on its place on the path to modern juvenile justice.
Community & Social IssuesHenrico Departments & ServicesHistoryPublic Safety: Police Fire Sheriff
201333 minutes
Piece of Our Past: The Old Henrico Courthouse and Jail, A
Long before Henrico's modern administration and courts complex was built on Parham Road, the center of county government was nestled on a little island in the City of Richmond. Join HCTV as we chronicle more than two and a half centuries since the first Henrico courthouse was built at 22nd and Main, the controversy surrounding the ownership of the property, the gradual relocation of county operations and the ultimate fate of the Victorian marvel that still rests there today.
ArchitectureHistoryNotable Places
201532 minutes
Pocahontas: The Myth and Mystery of an Icon
Although more than 400 years have passed since she stepped into history, Pocahontas continues to capture the imagination of people everywhere. While representations of her continue to proliferate, how much is really known about the enigmatic icon? Join HCTV for a fresh look at the making of the legend, and how her fascinating journey unfolded.
201634 minutes
Pride & Precision: The Honor Guards of Henrico County
With polish and precision, the honor guards of Henrico County lead by quiet example and command respect for the flags of our nation, state and county. They also help honor the men and women who serve and sacrifice for us all. The Police and Fire divisions and the Sheriff's Office each has its own ceremonial unit. They continue a proud military tradition that dates to 1784 and the end of the American Revolution.
Henrico Departments & ServicesHistoryPublic Safety: Police Fire Sheriff
201515 minutes
Raymond Bennett Pinchbeck: The Good Neighbor
The students at Pinchbeck Elementary School are known as the Rays — for good reason. The school's name and mascot come from Raymond B. Pinchbeck, a man who served his community locally and nationally. As a Henrico School Board member, a Dean at the University of Richmond and a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy, Pinchbeck brightened lives throughout the community and inspired a character in the popular 1970s television series The Waltons.
201428 minutes
Richard Evelyn Byrd: Admiral of the Antarctic
By the early 1950s, Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd had become one of the world's experts on the Earth's polar regions. Leading his men into undiscovered icy territory in the name of science and exploration earned him the label of an American hero during the first half of the 20th century. Learn about Virginia's own extraordinary explorer, and original namesake of Richmond International Airport, in Richard Evelyn Byrd: Admiral of the Antarctic.
201142 minutes
Safely Rest: The Saga of Taps, An American Bugle Call
Taps, the unmistakable bugle melody that has signaled day's end for our military for more than 150 years, is perhaps best known as a song of mourning and as the final tribute at funerals for service members. While the twenty-four deceptively simple notes are easily recognizable, their origin is much more complex. Join HCTV for a musical journey that spans the Eastern Henrico Civil War battles in the summer of 1862, and the creation of Taps at Berkeley Plantation soon thereafter, to Arlington National Cemetery where it is played an average of thirty times a day.
201427 minutes
Southern Man of Mystery: Edgar Allan Poe
This premiere edition of Central Virginia Biographies takes you into the world of "America's Shakespeare," Edgar Allan Poe. The brilliant but troubled writer is credited with mastering the genre of science fiction, detective fiction, and the horror story, in addition to creating mesmerizing poetry and establishing the format of the short story. The legendary author of The Raven, The Tell-Tale Heart and The Fall of the House of Usher grew up in Richmond, and considered himself a Virginian wherever his travels led him. Take a poetic journey back in time with HCTV's Southern Man of Mystery: Edgar Allan Poe.
200837 minutes
Story of Mercer Hugh Cosby Farm, The
The Mercer Hugh Cosby Farm, located in western Henrico County, has been part of one family’s story for five generations. Significant for its ownership by one African-American family dating back to the late 1800s, Mercer Hugh Cosby built the farmhouse in the 1880s on 52-acres. Today, the Cosby farm teems with cornstalks and other crops — and it gives barely notice to the suburban development that’s sprung up nearby. Join HCTV as we learn more about this family of farmers, educators and preservationist and its notable place in Henrico’s history.
HistoryNotable Places
201720 minutes
Strumming Up the Past: Henrico's Bluegrass Music
Bluegrass represents a distinctly American style of music, a beautiful blend of old-timey, Celtic, gospel, country and blues. Henrico County is keeping the music alive by organizing a bluegrass jam each month at Dorey Park. If you've stood before the microphone and or clapped from the audience, you know there's something about bluegrass that tugs on your soul.
201324 minutes
Taking to the Sky: First Ladies of Aviation
In 1903, the Wright Brothers harnessed the mystery of flight. Male-dominated American aviators began to explore the skies and capture the imagination. But before long, women stepped forward with their own spirit of adventure. Join HCTV as we meet Martha C. West, Genevieve Krimm Orange and Maude "Maxine" Walker who found their passion for flying and a desire to go beyond the traditional roles expected of women.
HistoryNature & Science
201426 minutes
Tommy Edwards: Henrico’s Hit Maker
Singer-songwriter Tommy Edwards crooned his way to the top of the charts in the 1950s, selling millions of records in the U.S. and around the world. The Henrico native appeared on the programs of entertainment icons Ed Sullivan and Dick Clark, and headlined shows in major cities. But fame would prove to be fleeting for Henrico’s biggest star, who found his career peaking at the same time American popular music was dramatically changing. Join HCTV on a musical journey through Tommy’s life and times, which began and ended in Henrico’s West End.
201829 minutes
Virginia Estelle Randolph: Pioneer Educator
Virginia Estelle Randolph was a pioneer educator in Henrico County during the 19th and 20th centuries. Her innovative ideas and vocational curriculum termed "The Henrico Plan" was adopted throughout the south and internationally. Randolph made remarkable strides in African-American education during an unsettled time in our history. Join HCTV as we look inside the life of Virginia Estelle Randolph, and learn how her legacy lives on today.
200929 minutes
Virginia: The Mother of Presidents
Virginia is known as the Mother of Presidents for good reason: more United States presidents hail from this great state than any other. Virginia has produced eight U.S. presidents, including Washington, Jefferson, Monroe, Harrison, Tyler, Taylor and Wilson. Each played a vital role in the formation of our country and our democratic form of government. These insightful and experienced leaders guided our country through times of war and peace, and helped shape the United States of America.
201241 minutes
Vote Here! Virginia’s History of Voting and Elections
For more than two centuries, Virginia’s electorate has expanded and become more representative of its people — though not without struggle. Much like the voting ranks have changed over time, so has the process. Changes brought by the Voting Rights Act and other measures inspired by the Civil Rights Movement reverberated throughout the Commonwealth. The unfettered right to vote is available to more Virginians today than at any point in the state’s history. That right is not always exercised, however. Join HCTV as we explore the history of voting and the evolution of elections in Virginia.
Community & Social IssuesHistory
201725 minutes
Welcome to Dabbs House
Henrico's historic Dabbs House has been restored and is now open to the public for an inside look at this significant national landmark. The structure has been used for many diverse purposes through its lifetime, including an antebellum farmhouse, Confederate General Robert E. Lee's headquarters, an alms house, Henrico police headquarters and an office building. Visitors will learn fascinating stories about the Dabbs House, and discover why it has stood the test of time.
ArchitectureHistoryNotable Places
20088 minutes
Welcome to Meadow Farm Museum
The history of the rolling fields and grassy pastures of Meadow Farm is a story of land and people. It stretches over seven generations of the Sheppard family, tracing back to Virginia's earliest days and beyond. Land that was once inhabited by the Monacan Indians has been host to a thriving agricultural farm, an unsuccessful slave revolt by Gabriel Prosser, the doorstep to a 13 mile long Union march to the battle of Yellow Tavern, and eventually a generous gift by the Crump family as a historical museum and park to the residents of Henrico County.
HistoryNotable Places
200910 minutes
Westwood Community, The: Built on Faith and Resilience
In the near West End of Richmond — not far from the bustle of Willow Lawn — stands a community that speaks to the power of unity, determination and perseverance. The village of Westwood was established by former slaves in the late 19th century in what was then a remote, rural part of Henrico County. Over decades, the community grew to include dozens of humble homes as well as stores, a church and a school. But the community found itself drawn into a fight for its own survival. Facing seemingly impossible odds, the families held firm and discovered just how resilient their village could be.
Community & Social IssuesHistory
201821 minutes