HCTV Program Schedule

Henrico County Television (HCTV) programming is now available through Comcast’s Video On Demand service. To access HCTV programs, select the “Get Local” folder, followed by “Government,” and finally “Access Henrico.” Video On Demand allows our Comcast cable subscribers to choose which HCTV program they want to watch and when they want to watch it. Approximately 25 programs are available at one time. We change the program line-up monthly. You may also request a DVD of an HCTV program by calling Public Relations at 501-4257.
View select HCTV programs online.
Check out our YouTube channel.

Watch HCTV live.

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EVEN HOURS

12 am, 2 am, 4 am, 6 am, 8 am, 10 am, Noon, 2 pm, 4 pm, 6 pm, 8 pm, 10 pm

ODD HOURS

1 am, 3 am, 5 am, 7 am, 9 am, 11 am, 1 pm, 3 pm, 5 pm, 7 pm, 9 pm, 11 pm

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Watch our message board between scheduled programming every day for current Henrico events, services and public meeting information.

Frozen in Time: The Ruins of the James River Steam Brewery (23 mins)

The arched cellar entrance of David Yuengling Junior’s once mighty James River Steam Brewery is a portal to an amazing tale that lies buried in a Rocketts Landing hillside, nearly forgotten for a century. The mysterious facade bears no trace of the famous name or the tumultuous times during which an American staple, lager beer, was produced on a massive scale right here in Henrico County. Join HCTV for a journey into the cellars and back in time.

Larger than Life: Captain John Cussons (1838-1912) (23 mins)

With a life that spanned from his native England to the American frontier and ultimately Henrico County, John Cussons left us with a colorful image of his spirited adventures and brash personality. But what do we really know about him? Is it possible to separate the truth from the fiction? The man from the legend? Join HCTV as we learn about the fearless pioneer in Larger than Life: Captain John Cussons (1838-1912).

When Food Can Kill You: Living with Food Allergies (13 mins)

For some people, food choices are a matter of life and death. Allergic reactions to certain foods can arise suddenly, with symptoms ranging from mild to severe. Join HCTV as we talk to people coping with food allergies, medical professionals and parents of children with the condition in When Food Can Kill You: Living with Food Allergies.

Pocahontas: The Myth and Mystery of an Icon (34 mins)

Although more than 400 years have passed since she stepped into history, Pocahontas continues to capture the imagination of people everywhere. While representations of her continue to proliferate, how much is really known about the enigmatic icon? Join HCTV for a fresh look at the making of the legend, and how her fascinating journey unfolded.

Juvenile Detention in Henrico County: Rebuilding Lives to Benefit Our Community (16 mins)

The Henrico County Juvenile Detention Home and the James River Juvenile Detention Center offer much more than a secure place for youth awaiting court action or serving short sentences. With the help of their caring staffs and innovative programming, the facilities help youths continue their education, work through any emotional or other challenges and prepare them upon release to become contributing members of the community.

Cashell Donahoe: A Gentleman and a Scholar (18 mins)

Cashell Donahoe left an indelible mark on Henrico County, having served as assistant superintendent of schools from 1956 until 1974. But Donahoe was more than a teacher and an administrator. He was a mountain of a man, with an abiding faith, a commitment to others and a thirst for knowledge. Join HCTV as we examine the life of Cashell Donahoe: A Gentleman and a Scholar.

Curtain Call: A History of the Henrico Theatre (25 mins)

When it opened its doors in 1938, the Henrico Theatre was described as a “big city temple of entertainment set in beautiful rural surroundings.” A classic example of art-deco architecture, the theatre was the crown jewel of Highland Springs. After years of successes and changes of ownership, the Henrico Theatre closed its doors— until Henrico County purchased the property in 1999. Join HCTV as we reveal the story behind the theatre, follow the extensive renovation process and learn how it has become a historic landmark in the county.

Four Centuries of Conflict and Confusion: The History of Dutch Gap (22 mins)

The history of Dutch Gap and the people who lived there spans four centuries of conflict and confusion. The Dutch Gap canal, located on the James River near the 17th-century Citie of Henricus, was originally constructed during the Civil War to shortcut the seven-mile loop around Farrar’s Island. Join HCTV as we learn about Dutch Gap, how it got its name, and the many wars and battles fought throughout its history.

Forging Freedom: The Story of Gabriel’s Rebellion (29 mins)

Were it not for a typical late summer storm in Central Virginia, the events planned for August 30, 1800 might have changed the history of our country forever. A slave named Gabriel, owned by Thomas Henry Prosser of Brookfield plantation, conceived and organized a widespread slave uprising. Involving several Virginia localities, it was possibly the most far-reaching slave uprising planned in the history of the South. The plan might have succeeded had it not been for a sudden, severe downpour and the disclosure of the plot by several slaves, including Tom and Pharoah, who belonged to Mosby Sheppard of Meadow Farm. The alarm went out and the rebellion was thwarted. The effects of the conspiracy were profound and as a result, county and state leaders instituted legislation to regulate the movement of slaves and free blacks. Join HCTV as we tell the story of Gabriel and the failed insurrection in Forging Freedom: The Story of Gabriel’s Rebellion.

For Family and Community: The Life of William Leroy Vandervall (20 mins)

William Vandervall was born in Richmond in 1860 to free black parents Leroy P. and Rebecca Vandervall. After the Civil War, the family saw opportunities beyond Richmond, and settled in an area of western Henrico known as Rio Vista. The family’s commitment to education proved profound. William advocated for educational equality for black students, worked as a teacher for 20 years and was the first African-American mail carrier in the area. His family’s land was used for a church and two schools located on Quioccasin Road. Vandervall died on October 10th, 1934, at age 74. He left a legacy of service to his community and to Henrico County.

A Hidden History: The Story of East End Cemetery (21 mins)

On the brightest of days, sunlight finds a way to cut through the canopies of mature trees at East End Cemetery in Henrico County. Don’t be misled by the heavy undergrowth and tangles of vines — this is sacred ground, the final resting place for thousands of African-Americans from the turn of the 20th century. Join HCTV as we gain insight into the cemetery’s rich cultural history, and learn how the land is slowly being reclaimed by volunteers determined to uncover East End’s secrets.

Virginia Estelle Randolph: Pioneer Educator (29 mins)

On the brightest of days, sunlight finds a way to cut through the canopies of mature trees at East End Cemetery in Henrico County. Don’t be misled by the heavy undergrowth and tangles of vines — this is sacred ground, the final resting place for thousands of African-Americans from the turn of the 20th century. Join HCTV as we gain insight into the cemetery’s rich cultural history, and learn how the land is slowly being reclaimed by volunteers determined to uncover East End’s secrets.

The History of Gravel Hill (16 mins)

Gravel Hill sits tucked away in eastern Henrico County, bearing only humble monuments to its extraordinary history. Among the rustic surroundings are a scattering of modest homes, a small church and an old school building. The community dates back to 1771, and has persevered against the odds due to grit, determination, self-reliance and pride. Join HCTV as we tell this remarkable story of one of the first African-American communities in the nation.

Desegregation: Stories of Integration of Henrico Public Schools (28 mins)

The Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s brought seismic change to American society. Perhaps the greatest impact was felt in education. The U.S. Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown vs. the Board of Education ordered that racial segregation in schools gave unequal treatment to blacks and whites, and was unconstitutional. The decision meant school systems would have to integrate. In Henrico County, the process of school desegregation occurred gradually from 1963 to 1969. Join HCTV as we hear the stories and learn the history of this revolution in education.

The Westwood Community: Built on Faith and Resilience (21 mins)

In the near West End of Richmond — not far from the bustle of Willow Lawn — stands a community that speaks to the power of unity, determination and perseverance. The village of Westwood was established by former slaves in the late 19th century in what was then a remote, rural part of Henrico County. Over decades, the community grew to include dozens of humble homes as well as stores, a church and a school. But the community found itself drawn into a fight for its own survival. Facing seemingly impossible odds, the families held firm and discovered just how resilient their village could be.

The Story of Mercer Hugh Cosby Farm (20 mins)

The Mercer Hugh Cosby Farm, located in western Henrico County, has been part of one family’s story for five generations. Significant for its ownership by one African-American family dating back to the late 1800s, Mercer Hugh Cosby built the farmhouse in the 1880s on 52-acres. Today, the Cosby farm teems with cornstalks and other crops — and it gives barely notice to the suburban development that’s sprung up nearby. Join HCTV as we learn more about this family of farmers, educators and preservationist and its notable place in Henrico’s history.

Contact Us

Public Relations

Western Government Center
2nd Floor

4301 E. Parham Rd
Henrico, VA 23228

Phone
(804) 501-4257

Fax
(804) 501-5500

Mailing Address
P. O. Box 90775
Henrico, VA 23273-0775

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