HCTV Program Schedule

 

 

Henrico County Television (HCTV) programming is now available through Comcast’s Video On Demand service. To access HCTV programs, select the “Get Local” folder, followed by “Government,” and finally “Access Henrico.” Video On Demand allows our Comcast cable subscribers to choose which HCTV program they want to watch and when they want to watch it. Approximately 25 programs are available at one time. We change the program line-up monthly.

You may also request a DVD of an HCTV program by calling Public Relations & Media Services at 501-4257.

View select HCTV programs online.
Check out our YouTube channel.

Watch HCTV live.

1153

EVEN HOURS

12 am, 2 am, 4 am, 6 am, 8 am, 10 am, Noon, 2 pm, 4 pm, 6 pm, 8 pm, 10 pm

ODD HOURS

1 am, 3 am, 5 am, 7 am, 9 am, 11 am, 1 pm, 3 pm, 5 pm, 7 pm, 9 pm, 11 pm

Feb 12
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Feb 18

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T Th Sa

Feb 19
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Feb 25

M W F Su

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Feb 26
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Mar 4

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Mar 5
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Mar 11

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Watch our message board between scheduled programming every day for current Henrico events, services and public meeting information.

Inside Henrico: Winter 2018 (15 mins)

This edition of Inside Henrico feature packages include:

  • School Bus Seat Belts
  • Solicitors in Medians
  • E-billing
  • Internship Program
  • Henrico Theatre Anniversary

Desegregation: Stories of Integration of Henrico Public Schools (28 mins)

The Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s brought seismic change to American society. Perhaps the greatest impact was felt in education. The U.S. Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown vs. the Board of Education ordered that racial segregation in schools gave unequal treatment to blacks and whites, and was unconstitutional. The decision meant school systems would have to integrate. In Henrico County, the process of school desegregation occurred gradually from 1963 to 1969. Join HCTV as we hear the stories and learn the history of this revolution in education.

Forging Freedom: The Story of Gabriel’s Rebellion (29 mins)

Were it not for a typical late summer storm in Central Virginia, the events planned for August 30, 1800 might have changed the history of our country forever. A slave named Gabriel, owned by Thomas Henry Prosser of Brookfield plantation, conceived and organized a widespread slave uprising. Involving several Virginia localities, it was possibly the most far-reaching slave uprising planned in the history of the South. The plan might have succeeded had it not been for a sudden, severe downpour and the disclosure of the plot by several slaves, including Tom and Pharoah, who belonged to Mosby Sheppard of Meadow Farm. The alarm went out and the rebellion was thwarted. The effects of the conspiracy were profound and as a result, county and state leaders instituted legislation to regulate the movement of slaves and free blacks. Join HCTV as we tell the story of Gabriel and the failed insurrection in Forging Freedom: The Story of Gabriel’s Rebellion.

A Hidden History: The Story of East End Cemetery (21 mins)

On the brightest of days, sunlight finds a way to cut through the canopies of mature trees at East End Cemetery in Henrico County. Don’t be misled by the heavy undergrowth and tangles of vines — this is sacred ground, the final resting place for thousands of African-Americans from the turn of the 20th century. Join HCTV as we gain insight into the cemetery’s rich cultural history, and learn how the land is slowly being reclaimed by volunteers determined to uncover East End’s secrets.

A Day in the Life: A Reenactment of the Battle at New Market Heights (21 mins)

On September 29, 1864, on fields south of New Market Road, African-American soldiers serving in the U.S. Colored Troops led an assault against Richmond’s outer ring of defenses. One-hundred fifty years later, Henrico County brought the day back to life. More than 100 acres of Henrico farmland were transformed into the New Market Heights battlefield. Nearly 1,000 reenactors traveled from around the country to recreate the battle of New Market Heights. Watch how Henrico County bears witness — both then and now — to a significant moment in American history.

The History of Gravel Hill (16 mins)

Gravel Hill sits tucked away in eastern Henrico County, bearing only humble monuments to its extraordinary history. Among the rustic surroundings are a scattering of modest homes, a small church and an old school building. The community dates back to 1771, and has persevered against the odds due to grit, determination, self-reliance and pride. Join HCTV as we tell this remarkable story of one of the first African-American communities in the nation.

For Family and Community: The Life of William Leroy Vandervall (20 mins)

William Vandervall was born in Richmond in 1860 to free black parents Leroy P. and Rebecca Vandervall. After the Civil War, the family saw opportunities beyond Richmond, and settled in an area of western Henrico known as Rio Vista. The family’s commitment to education proved profound. William advocated for educational equality for black students, worked as a teacher for 20 years and was the first African-American mail carrier in the area. His family’s land was used for a church and two schools located on Quioccasin Road. Vandervall died on October 10th, 1934, at age 74. He left a legacy of service to his community and to Henrico County.

Virginia Estelle Randolph: Pioneer Educator (29 mins)

Virginia Estelle Randolph was a pioneer educator in Henrico County during the 19th and 20th centuries. Her innovative ideas and vocational curriculum termed “The Henrico Plan” was adopted throughout the south and internationally. Randolph made remarkable strides in African-American education during an unsettled time in our history. Join HCTV as we look inside the life of Virginia Estelle Randolph, and learn how her legacy lives on today.

Forging Freedom: The Story of Gabriel’s Rebellion (29 mins)

Were it not for a typical late summer storm in Central Virginia, the events planned for August 30, 1800 might have changed the history of our country forever. A slave named Gabriel, owned by Thomas Henry Prosser of Brookfield plantation, conceived and organized a widespread slave uprising. Involving several Virginia localities, it was possibly the most far-reaching slave uprising planned in the history of the South. The plan might have succeeded had it not been for a sudden, severe downpour and the disclosure of the plot by several slaves, including Tom and Pharoah, who belonged to Mosby Sheppard of Meadow Farm. The alarm went out and the rebellion was thwarted. The effects of the conspiracy were profound and as a result, county and state leaders instituted legislation to regulate the movement of slaves and free blacks. Join HCTV as we tell the story of Gabriel and the failed insurrection in Forging Freedom: The Story of Gabriel’s Rebellion.

Tommy Edwards: Henrico’s Hit Maker (29 mins)

Singer-songwriter Tommy Edwards crooned his way to the top of the charts in the 1950s, selling millions of records in the U.S. and around the world. The Henrico native appeared on the programs of entertainment icons Ed Sullivan and Dick Clark, and headlined shows in major cities. But fame would prove to be fleeting for Henrico’s biggest star, who found his career peaking at the same time American popular music was dramatically changing. Join HCTV on a musical journey through Tommy’s life and times, which began and ended in Henrico’s West End.

A Hidden History: The Story of East End Cemetery (21 mins)

On the brightest of days, sunlight finds a way to cut through the canopies of mature trees at East End Cemetery in Henrico County. Don’t be misled by the heavy undergrowth and tangles of vines — this is sacred ground, the final resting place for thousands of African-Americans from the turn of the 20th century. Join HCTV as we gain insight into the cemetery’s rich cultural history, and learn how the land is slowly being reclaimed by volunteers determined to uncover East End’s secrets.

A Day in the Life: A Reenactment of the Battle at New Market Heights (21 mins)

On September 29, 1864, on fields south of New Market Road, African-American soldiers serving in the U.S. Colored Troops led an assault against Richmond’s outer ring of defenses. One-hundred fifty years later, Henrico County brought the day back to life. More than 100 acres of Henrico farmland were transformed into the New Market Heights battlefield. Nearly 1,000 reenactors traveled from around the country to recreate the battle of New Market Heights. Watch how Henrico County bears witness — both then and now — to a significant moment in American history.

Hometown Hero: Arthur Ashe, Jr. (28 mins)

Arthur Ashe, Jr. is known worldwide as a tennis champion, an advocate for education and for his tragic death due to AIDS-related pneumonia as a result of a blood transfusion. Ashe’s legacy and his ties to Central Virginia are further cemented in the Henrico County public school that bears his name, Arthur Ashe, Jr. Elementary. Join HCTV as we explore the man behind the tennis racket, and learn about how he used his notoriety to help the people of Richmond, especially children.

The Story of Mercer Hugh Cosby Farm (20 mins)

The Mercer Hugh Cosby Farm, located in western Henrico County, has been part of one family’s story for five generations. Significant for its ownership by one African-American family dating back to the late 1800s, Mercer Hugh Cosby built the farmhouse in the 1880s on 52-acres. Today, the Cosby farm teems with cornstalks and other crops — and it gives barely notice to the suburban development that’s sprung up nearby. Join HCTV as we learn more about this family of farmers, educators and preservationist and its notable place in Henrico’s history.

Crystal Clear: Henrico County Water Reclamation Facility (21 mins)

Each time we do a load of laundry, take a shower, flush the toilet or wash our hands, we produce wastewater that seems to magically disappear through unseen pipes. In fact, in Henrico County, we produce more than 42 million gallons of wastewater every day. This wastewater must be cleaned, treated and prepared before reentering our environment through the James River. Join HCTV as we tour the high tech (if sometimes smelly) Water Reclamation Facility where this fascinating process takes place. From the natural use of nutrient eating organisms to the multi-step treatment process, Henrico’s Water Reclamation Facility makes sure the water returned to the James is crystal clear.

Active Shooter: What Would You Do? (21 mins)

Decades ago, none of us had ever heard the term “active shooter.” Unfortunately, it’s all too commonplace in our world today, and it can happen anywhere at any time. If you were involved in an active shooter incident, what would you do to survive? Run? Hide? Fight? Join HCTV as we learn from public safety agents and officials what we can do if we ever find ourselves in this horrific position.

Without Warning: How Henrico Responds to Water Main Breaks (13 mins)

It can happen at any time, anywhere, without notice. A water main can suddenly burst, disrupting service and causing roads to buckle and crumble. Are they happening more often lately? Truthfully, no. Water main breaks are simply a reality for communities as they grow and mature, and based on its size, Henrico has fewer than half as many breaks as the national average. Join HCTV as we learn how our crews respond to water main breaks 24/7, 365 days a year.

Cashell Donahoe: A Gentleman and a Scholar (18 mins)

Cashell Donahoe left an indelible mark on Henrico County, having served as assistant superintendent of schools from 1956 until 1974. But Donahoe was more than a teacher and an administrator. He was a mountain of a man, with an abiding faith, a commitment to others and a thirst for knowledge. Join HCTV as we examine the life of Cashell Donahoe: A Gentleman and a Scholar.

Contact Us

Public Relations & Media Services

Western Government Center
2nd Floor

4301 E. Parham Rd
Henrico, VA 23228

Phone
(804) 501-4257

Fax
(804) 501-5500

Mailing Address
P. O. Box 90775
Henrico, VA 23273-0775

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