HCTV Program Schedule

Henrico County Television (HCTV) programming is now available through Comcast’s Video On Demand service. To access HCTV programs, select the “Get Local” folder, followed by “Government,” and finally “Access Henrico.” Video On Demand allows our Comcast cable subscribers to choose which HCTV program they want to watch and when they want to watch it. Approximately 25 programs are available at one time. We change the program line-up monthly.You may also request a DVD of an HCTV program by calling Public Relations & Media Services at 501-4257.
View select HCTV programs online.
Check out our YouTube channel.

Watch HCTV live.

1153

EVEN HOURS

12 am, 2 am, 4 am, 6 am, 8 am, 10 am, Noon, 2 pm, 4 pm, 6 pm, 8 pm, 10 pm

ODD HOURS

1 am, 3 am, 5 am, 7 am, 9 am, 11 am, 1 pm, 3 pm, 5 pm, 7 pm, 9 pm, 11 pm

Feb 24
through
Mar 1

M W F Su

T Th Sa

Mar 2
through
Mar 8

M W F Su

T Th Sa

Mar 9
through
Mar 15

M W F Su

T Th Sa

Mar 16
through
Mar 22

M W F Su

T Th Sa

Watch our message board between scheduled programming every day for current Henrico events, services and public meeting information.

Tommy Edwards: Henrico’s Hit Maker (29 mins)

Singer-songwriter Tommy Edwards crooned his way to the top of the charts in the 1950s, selling millions of records in the U.S. and around the world. The Henrico native appeared on the programs of entertainment icons Ed Sullivan and Dick Clark, and headlined shows in major cities. But fame would prove to be fleeting for Henrico’s biggest star, who found his career peaking at the same time American popular music was dramatically changing. Join HCTV on a musical journey through Tommy’s life and times, which began and ended in Henrico’s West End.

For Family and Community: The Life of William Leroy Vandervall (20 mins)

William Vandervall was born in Richmond in 1860 to free black parents Leroy P. and Rebecca Vandervall. After the Civil War, the family saw opportunities beyond Richmond, and settled in an area of western Henrico known as Rio Vista. The family’s commitment to education proved profound. William advocated for educational equality for black students, worked as a teacher for 20 years and was the first African-American mail carrier in the area. His family’s land was used for a church and two schools located on Quioccasin Road. Vandervall died on October 10th, 1934, at age 74. He left a legacy of service to his community and to Henrico County.

The Story of Mercer Hugh Cosby Farm (20 mins)

The Mercer Hugh Cosby Farm, located in western Henrico County, has been part of one family’s story for five generations. Significant for its ownership by one African-American family dating back to the late 1800s, Mercer Hugh Cosby built the farmhouse in the 1880s on 52-acres. Today, the Cosby farm teems with cornstalks and other crops — and it gives barely notice to the suburban development that’s sprung up nearby. Join HCTV as we learn more about this family of farmers, educators and preservationist and its notable place in Henrico’s history.

Forging Freedom: The Story of Gabriel’s Rebellion (29 mins)

Were it not for a typical late summer storm in Central Virginia, the events planned for August 30, 1800 might have changed the history of our country forever. A slave named Gabriel, owned by Thomas Henry Prosser of Brookfield plantation, conceived and organized a widespread slave uprising. Involving several Virginia localities, it was possibly the most far-reaching slave uprising planned in the history of the South. The plan might have succeeded had it not been for a sudden, severe downpour and the disclosure of the plot by several slaves, including Tom and Pharoah, who belonged to Mosby Sheppard of Meadow Farm. The alarm went out and the rebellion was thwarted. The effects of the conspiracy were profound and as a result, county and state leaders instituted legislation to regulate the movement of slaves and free blacks. Join HCTV as we tell the story of Gabriel and the failed insurrection in Forging Freedom: The Story of Gabriel’s Rebellion.

A Day in the Life: A Reenactment of the Battle at New Market Heights (21 mins)

On September 29, 1864, on fields south of New Market Road, African-American soldiers serving in the U.S. Colored Troops led an assault against Richmond’s outer ring of defenses. One-hundred fifty years later, Henrico County brought the day back to life. More than 100 acres of Henrico farmland were transformed into the New Market Heights battlefield. Nearly 1,000 reenactors traveled from around the country to recreate the battle of New Market Heights. Watch how Henrico County bears witness — both then and now — to a significant moment in American history. 

From the Mines of Henrico: The Beginnings of Our Nation’s Coal Industry (21 mins)

Coal has been used as an energy source worldwide for thousands of years. In the United States, the coal industry originated on the banks of the James River and mines right here in Henrico County. Join HCTV as we document the industry’s rise and fall, and see what remains today of Henrico’s often overlooked coal history.

Henrico’s Iron: Ironclad Battles on the James River (25 mins)

The James River in eastern Henrico County serves as a watery grave for three mighty ships from the Civil War. Today, the CSS Richmond, Virginia II and Fredericksburg remain casualties from the James River Squadron and footnotes to America’s struggle to unite its North and South. But during the War, they marked an advanced breed of armored ship. They were Ironclads that forever changed naval combat. HCTV uncovers the untold story of Henrico’s maritime combats during the Civil War in Henrico’s Iron: Ironclad Battles on the James River.

All Aboard! The History of the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad (27 mins)

The Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad was the sixth railroad to be chartered in the commonwealth, receiving exclusive rights from the General Assembly to connect Richmond and Fredericksburg to the Potomac River steamboat lines. RF&P played a key role in the Civil War and World War II, after which it modernized from steam engines to diesel locomotives. Over the course of its 157-year history the company acquired significant amounts of property along its route, including a number of acres in Henrico County — land that is now home to Glen Allen Stadium at RF&P Park. Though its trains no longer run through the heart of Virginia, the RF&P remains embedded in the history of the communities it touched and in the imagination of the people it served. 

When Food Can Kill You: Living with Food Allergies (13 mins)

For some people, food choices are a matter of life and death. Allergic reactions to certain foods can arise suddenly, with symptoms ranging from mild to severe. Join HCTV as we talk to people coping with food allergies, medical professionals and parents of children with the condition in When Food Can Kill You: Living with Food Allergies.

Henrico Area Mental Health and Developmental Services: Celebrating Fifty Years of Service (10 mins)

Since the establishment of the Henrico Mental Hygiene Clinic in 1968 and the creation of the Community Mental Health Services Board the following year, area residents have had a trusted resource for their mental health concerns. From its humble beginnings, Henrico Area Mental Health and Developmental Services has been innovating and adapting to meet the needs of clients, and now provides a host of life-changing, community-based services including developmental disability, early intervention and substance use services for the 360,000 residents of Henrico, Charles City and New Kent counties.

Going Up? The History and Evolution of the Modern Elevator (18 mins)

Elevators provide a fast, practical way to move in our daily lives. The elevator — or “lift” as it’s known in some parts of the world — was not originally designed with people in mind. They carried materials and freight for industry. However, elevators quickly became a selling point for hotels and helped bring about modern skyscrapers, including the Empire State Building. Join HCTV as we look at the evolution of the modern elevator and how Henrico’s Department of Building Inspections ensures our county’s elevators are safe and sound.

Jackson Davis: Catalyst for Educational Equality (22 mins)

Jackson Davis made his name as an education reformer. He travelled with his camera, taking thousands of photographs documenting the often-poor condition of African-American education in the South during the first half of the 20th century. These stark images and Davis’ meticulous notes helped attract private investment that gradually lifted rural communities still suffering from the Civil War. While his service to Henrico lasted only a few years, Davis’ legacy continues. In 1962, the School Board opened Jackson Davis Elementary honoring the catalyst for educational equality.

The Open Road: The Interstate Highways in Henrico County (22 mins)

The National System of Interstate and Defense Highways united the far corners of the nation, changing lives and landscapes along the way. While their existence is largely taken for granted, they remain the most ambitious public works project in American history. More than one thousand miles of the network was allocated for Virginia in the 1956 plan. Henrico County benefitted from three components: I-95, I-64 and I-295. Together, they formed the framework for Henrico’s future growth. Join HCTV for a revealing road trip that connects past and present.

Dr. William C. Bosher, Jr.: The Man Behind the Bow Tie (35 mins)

William Cleveland Bosher Junior was born January 21, 1946 in Richmond, and spent his childhood on his family’s small farm in Hanover County. He landed his first teaching job in 1968 at Henrico’s J.R. Tucker High School at the age of 22, eventually becoming Superintendent of Schools for Henrico County, Chesterfield County, and the Commonwealth of Virginia. He influenced the education of countless children and was known for his educational expertise nationally and internationally — as well as his trademark bow tie. His legacy is in the lives he touched and the spirit of hope he cultivated everywhere he went. Join HCTV as we experience his extraordinary life in Dr. William C. Bosher, Jr.: The Man Behind the Bow Tie.

Pride and Precision: The Honor Guards of Henrico County (15 mins)

With polish and precision, the honor guards of Henrico County lead by quiet example and command respect for the flags of our nation, state and county. They also help honor the men and women who serve and sacrifice for us all. The Police and Fire divisions and the Sheriff’s Office each has its own ceremonial unit. They continue a proud military tradition that dates to 1784 and the end of the American Revolution.

Faith, Smiles and Public Service: The Story of Dr. Jacob L. Adams (16 mins)

Jacob L. Adams Elementary School sits along Laburnum Avenue in Henrico’s East End. Opened in 1967, the school is named for Dr. Jacob L. Adams, a former member and Chair of the Henrico School Board and a beloved dentist in the Highland Springs area. An active community member, Adams was devoted to his local church, his patients, and his family. While serving on the School Board from 1945 to 1963, Dr. Adams oversaw a period of significant growth with the addition of 30 new public schools. Join HCTV as we shed light on Jacob L. Adams’ Highland Springs legacy.

Henrico Horticulture (15 mins)

Beautiful lawns depend on healthy soil, proper irrigation and regular mowing. Join HCTV and the Henrico office of Virginia Cooperative Extension as we explain how to collect soil samples for testing and understanding the results. We also show you how to set your irrigation system and offer turfgrass care tips to help your lawn thrive.

Contact Us

Public Relations & Media Services

Western Government Center
2nd Floor

4301 E. Parham Rd
Henrico, VA 23228

Phone
(804) 501-4257

Fax
(804) 501-5500

Mailing Address
P. O. Box 90775
Henrico, VA 23273-0775

Twitter Facebook YouTube Instagram Podcast

 
Google Translate Icon

Translate