Heritage and Identity

African American/Black Heritage

As a Harvard-trained historian, Carter G. Woodson, like W. E. B. Du Bois before him, believed that truth could not be denied and that reason would prevail over prejudice. His hopes to raise awareness of African American’s contributions to civilization was realized when he and the organization he founded, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), conceived and announced Negro History Week in 1925. The event was first celebrated during a week in February 1926 that encompassed the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The response was overwhelming: Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive whites, not simply white scholars and philanthropists, stepped forward to endorse the effort. Read more at blackhistorymonth.gov.

Hispanic Heritage

National Hispanic American Heritage Month, also known as Hispanic Heritage Month, has been observed from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 as a national holiday since 1988. We continue to honor and recognize the important contributions, diverse cultures and inseparable history of individuals whose lineage is connected to Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.  

Native Heritage

Since 1990, Congress has authorized an annual presidential proclamation that designates November as National American Indian Heritage Month, also known as Native American Heritage Month, to encourage everyone to learn about the contributions and cultures of the indigenous peoples of the North American continent. Such recognition, however, dates back further with state and organizational recognition of indigenous peoples days and commemorations occurring at the turn of the 20th century. 

 
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