Airwaves of Yesteryear: Early Television in Central Virginia

An Evolving Legend: The Story of Robert E. Lee

An Opportunity to Reform: The Laurel Industrial School and the History of Juvenile Corrections in Henrico

Armour House and Gardens at Meadowview Park, The

Attack Transport – Remembering the U.S.S. Henrico

Badge of Protection: The Henrico Sheriff’s Office

Battlefield Henrico – Savage Station – 1862

Beyond the Palisade: Life in 17th Century Henrico

Between The Lines: How Reconstruction Redrew The Map Of Henrico

Breaking Through: The Women of Henrico Police

Bridges of Henrico County, The

Central Virginia Biographies: Elizabeth Adam Crump

City Limits: Henrico Escapes Richmond’s Attempts to Merge and Annex

Clarke-Palmore House, The

Coal Mines of Henrico, The

Community’s Spirit, A: Historic Tales of Highland Springs

Culture & Pride: The History of Native Americans in Virginia

Curtain Call: A History of the Henrico Theatre

Defining Our Past: Street Names

Defining Our Past: The Stories Behind Henrico’s Names & Places

Douglas Southall Freeman: Voice of the Confederate Soldier

Dr. John Mosby Sheppard of Meadow Farm 1817-1877

Dr. Richard Archibald Patterson: A Self-Made Man

E Pluribus Unum: The Changing Face of Henrico County

Elizabeth Jane Holladay: Trailblazer of Public

Firehouse Flashbacks

For the Record: Henrico Circuit Court Clerk’s Office

Foundations In Time: Henrico’s Architectural Treasures

Foundations In Time II: More of Henrico’s Architectural Treasures

Four Centuries of Conflict and Confusion: The History of Dutch Gap

Fourth Estate, The: The Story of the Richmond Times-Dispatch

Frozen in Time: The Ruins of the James River Steam Brewery

George Henry Moody: A Man to Remember, A Name to Honor

Great War Remembered, The: Henrico’s Story of Service and Support

Greetings from Lakeside: Past, Present and Future

Henrico’s Iron: Ironclad Battles on the James River

Henrico’s Legacy: Commemorating 400 Years

Henrico’s View of the James River and Kanawha Canal

Historic Henrico Churches: Windows to Our Past

History of Short Pump, The

History of Recreation and Parks, The

Hometown Hero: Arthur Ashe, Jr.

Ideal Place to Live: A History of Sandston, The

In the Public Trust: Historic Preservation in Henrico County

Inside Innsbrook: How the West End Started

Iron Horse, The – Stories of Central Virginia Railroading

J.E.B. Stuart: Bold Cavalier

John Marshall: In the Opinion of the Court

John Randolph Tucker: A Heritage of Law

Legacy of Dabbs House, The

Larger than Life: Captain John Cussons (1838-1912)

Lewis Ginter: A Quiet Contribution

Mills E. Godwin: Virginia’s Statesman

Monticello: Thomas Jefferson’s Dream

Mother Maybelle and The Carter Sisters: The Henrico Years

No Stone Unturned: Cemetery Identification in Henrico

Officer’s Duty, An: The History of Henrico Police

On Air: Early Radio in Central Virginia

On the Green: Belmont Golf Course

Original Henrico Shire, The

Pandemic 1918: A Diary of the Flu

Promise Fulfilled, The: The History of Henrico County Public Schools

Raymond Bennett Pinchbeck: The Good Neighbor

Richard Evelyn Byrd: Admiral of the Antarctic

Road Through History, A

Safely Rest: The Saga of Taps, An American Bugle Call

Saving Lives: The History of Henrico’s Rescue Squads

Southern Man of Mystery, Edgar Allan Poe

State of Mind, A: The History of the Glen Allen Community

Story of Maude F. Trevvett, The: A Lifetime of Teaching

Strumming up the Past: Henrico’s Bluegrass Music

Taking Flight: Stories of Early Virginia Aviation 1864-1940

Taking Flight: Stories of Modern Virginia Aviation

Taking to the Sky: First Ladies of Aviation

Tough Choices: The County Manager Form of Government

Under the Lights – Richmond International Raceway

Until the Cows Come Home: A History of Dairy Farming in Henrico County, VA

Voices from Mountain Road: The Historic Mountain Road Corridor

Virginia Estelle Randolph: Pioneer Educator

Virginia: The Mother of Presidents

Welcome to Dabbs House

Welcome to Meadow Farm Museum

When the Clock Strikes Twelve: New Year’s Traditions

Will of the People, The: The Evolution of American Voting and Elections

 


 

View alphabetical listing of programs.
View chronological listing of programs.

 

 


Airwaves of Yesteryear: Early Television in Central Virginia (Running time: 30 minutes) – On April 22, 1948 the very first television broadcast south of our nation’s capital happened right here in Central Virginia. WTVR began a legacy of quality local programming, which was soon followed by WXEX and WRVA. These early television pioneers brought us local favorites including Dandy Doodle, Sailor Bob and Shock Theatre. Join HCTV as we celebrate more than 60 years of community programming and look at how this new form of entertainment changed our lives forever in Airwaves of Yesteryear: Early Television in Central Virginia.

Armour House and Gardens at Meadowview Park, The (Running time: 20 minutes) – Built between 1915 and 1918, the Armour House and Gardens at Meadowview Park is a sprawling 600-acre retreat boasting a scenic walking trail, tennis courts, children’s play areas, gardens and a flowing fountain surrounded by arbors with blooming vines. Join HCTV as we document the rich Henrico history of the Victorian style home and Meadowview Park with rare photographs and interviews chronicling the property’s intriguing past.

Attack Transport: Remembering the USS Henrico (Running time: 57 minutes) — First broadcast airs in honor of Veterans’ Day. The USS Henrico was a trusty workhorse from the beaches at D-Day through Korea and the Vietnam War. HCTV remembers the crew, their stories and the ship that bears the name of our county.

Badge of Protection: The Henrico Sheriff’s Office [Retired from Broadcast] (Running time: 26 minutes) — The Henrico Sheriff’s Office has served the county since 1634. Today, its responsibilities include court security, jail security, and serving the civil process. See how the deputies go above and beyond the call to serve and protect the citizens of Henrico.

Battlefield Henrico: Savage Station 1862 (Running time: 42 minutes) — Just days after General Robert E. Lee took command of the Army of Northern Virginia, the battlefront of the Civil War came to Henrico County. HCTV takes you to the battle of Savage Station, exploring what it was really like to fight face to face in the War Between the States. As the story unfolds, one thing becomes clear; the men on both sides were true warriors.

Between The Lines: How Reconstruction Redrew The Map Of Henrico (Running Time: 22 minutes) — You may know which magisterial district you live in, but do you know how that district came to be, or why its boundaries are where they are? The reasons are far more interesting and complex than you may think. Our districts and our Board of Supervisors structure of governance can trace their roots back to the turbulent years following the Civil War, known as the Reconstruction Period, and have been evolving with the times ever since.

Beyond the Palisade: Life in 17th Century Henrico (Running Time: 34 minutes) — Beyond the palisade takes you back to 1611 Henricus, the birthplace of Henrico County. HCTV examines who the colonists were, why they came here, what they hoped to achieve, and what difficulties they faced. Costumed interpreters and colonial experts tell a vivid, gritty tale of adventure, adversity and perseverance.

Breaking Through: The Women of Henrico Police (Running Time: 23 minutes) — Police work was once considered a man’s domain, but since 1965 Henrico has led the way in hiring women as police officers. Henrico’s first female police officer broke through the barrier more than a decade before Virginia’s State Police included women in their ranks. Join HCTV as we talk with some of Henrico’s women on the force — past and present — and hear their stories.

Bridges of Henrico County, The (Running time: 28 minutes) — The James River has been a center for commerce and travel since the 17th century. From the Huguenot and Willey, to the Varina-Enon and Pocahontas, HCTV brings you spectacular footage on the bridges connecting North and South.

Central Virginia Biographies: Elizabeth Adam Crump (Running Time: 19 minutes) — Born in 1891, Elizabeth Young Adam grew up in Richmond, and moved to Henrico in 1922, when she married her longtime beau, Sheppard Crump. They lived at Meadow Farm, where Elizabeth continued to live after her husband’s death in 1960. She devoted her life to volunteering and philanthropic activities, and was esteemed throughout the community. Following her husband’s wishes, she donated two parcels of land to Henrico County for today’s Meadow Farm Museum and the Crump Manor nursing home, where she spent the last years of her life. Join HCTV as we learn more about this fascinating lady in Central Virginia Biographies: Elizabeth Adam Crump.

City Limits: Henrico Escapes Richmond’s Attempts to Merge and Annex (Running time: 19 minutes) — When Henrico County’s population began to explode in the late 1950s and early 1960s, the City of Richmond attempted to acquire the county through a merger or “consolidation.” Henrico’s citizens flatly voted against the takeover attempt. Undeterred, the city then filed for a 142-square-mile annexation of the county–an astonishing 60 percent of the county’s land mass–in a courtroom battle that lasted several years. Learn how narrowly escaping these bold attempts has defined and shaped the present and future of Henrico, in City Limits.

Clarke-Palmore House, The (Running time: 16 minutes) — Originally built in 1819, The Clarke-Palmore House has undergone significant upgrades and modifications through the years to accommodate the changing needs of its residents. Vera Clarke Palmore Morton, the last resident of the house, donated the property to Henrico County for educational use. The Clarke-Palmore House is included on the National Register of Historic Places and was occupied by members of the same family for more than 140 years. Join HCTV as we document the evolution of the house and surrounding buildings through the decades.

Coal Mines of Henrico, The (Running time: 24 minutes) — Historically, coal was the fuel used for industry and heating in most of Virginia, and mine shafts are still being discovered today. Tune in to discover just how close to home coal was found and mined in Virginia.

Community’s Spirit, A: Historic Tales of Highland Springs (Running time: 25 minutes) — Highland Springs was founded in 1890 as one of Henrico’s first suburbs. Named for its high elevation and natural springs, the little unincorporated town became a hub of activity and community spirit. Hear from residents and high school alumni as they tell the tales of how Highland Springs came to be the unique community it is today.

Culture and Pride: Native American History in Virginia [Retired from Broadcast] (Running time: 57 minutes) — American Indians have lived in Virginia for 15,000 years. HCTV talks to Native Americans about their culture and the pride they have in their ancestral ways. You will experience the drums and the Pow Wow as well as see historic videos, photos, and maps. Learn how Virginia’s Indians have joined mainstream society, while holding on to their past in this landmark documentary.

Curtain Call: A History of the Henrico Theatre (Running time: 25 minutes) — When it opened its doors in 1938, the Henrico Theatre was described as a “big city temple of entertainment set in beautiful rural surroundings.” A classic example of art-deco architecture, the theatre was the crown jewel of Highland Springs. After years of successes and changes of ownership, the Henrico Theatre closed its doors— until Henrico County purchased the property in 1999. Join HCTV as we reveal the story behind the theatre, follow the extensive renovation process and learn how it has become a historic landmark in the county.

Defining Our Past: Street Names (Running time: 19 minutes) — Defining Our Past is back with more stories behind Henrico’s names and places. In this second edition, host Ryan Eubank examines the local lore of street names. How did Henrico’s streets and roads get their names, and how are new names developed? Ride along as HCTV sheds some light on this fascinating topic.

Defining Our Past: The Stories Behind Henrico’s Names and Places (Running Time: 21 minutes) — Have you ever wondered how streets, neighborhoods, districts, or Henrico County got their names? HCTV’s new series, Defining Our Past, will shed some light on their origins. In this first episode, host Ryan Eubank takes you on a tour of Henrico’s past starting with the founding of the Citie of Henricus.

Douglas Southall Freeman: Voice of the Confederate Soldier (Running Time: 38 minutes) — From a very early age, Douglas Southall Freeman dedicated himself to accurately recording the story of the Army of Northern Virginia and Robert E. Lee. His meticulous research methods and commitment to his work established him as a nationally known newspaper editor, radio commentator, military expert and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian. Join HCTV in this edition of Central Virginia Biographies as we explore what inspired and motivated Dr. Douglas Southall Freeman: Voice of the Confederate Soldier.

Dr. John Mosby Sheppard of Meadow Farm 1817-1877 (Running Time: 31 minutes) — Dr. John Mosby Sheppard of Meadow Farm was a country doctor and farmer during the 19th century–a very tumultuous time in Henrico County. Join HCTV as we shed light on Dr. Sheppard, take a glimpse into his medical practice, economic status and the Sheppard family’s life during the mid-1800s.

Dr. Richard Archibald Patterson: A Self-Made Man (Running time: 26 minutes) — Henrico residents probably recognize the name Patterson as one of the roads they often drive. The road’s namesake, however, is likely an afterthought. Dr. Richard Archibald Patterson was a giant of his time — a tobacco pioneer who helped forge his community’s recovery from the Civil War; a public servant and philanthropist; a doctor and Civil War surgeon; and a proud Henrico resident who envisioned big things for his community. Join HCTV as we uncover the story of the man, his era and the community he served.

E Pluribus Unum: The Changing Face of Henrico County (Running time: 29 minutes) — For centuries, Henrico County has been a destination for people seeking a better life. From the natives who first settled thousands of years ago and the English colonists of the 17th century, to refugees from war-torn countries in the Balkans, Asia, and Africa, our county has become a mosaic of cultures, and a microcosm of the world’s peoples. Join HCTV for a colorful glimpse into what brings people here from far and wide.

Elizabeth Jane Holladay: Trailblazer of Public Education (Running time: 15 minutes) — Henrico County Public Schools is widely recognized as one of the nation’s premier school systems, but this modern model of excellence comes from humble beginnings. One cornerstone was laid in the late 19th century, in the parlor of a home on Mountain Road, where a dedicated teacher began sharing her love of learning with a handful of children from the nearby farms. By the time she was done, Elizabeth Jane Holladay had helped build a foundation for public education in Henrico. Students today continue to learn under her watchful eye — at Holladay Elementary School in central Henrico, just a couple miles from her original classroom. Join HCTV as we learn about Miss Lizzie, her life and her dedication to education.

Evolving Legend, An: The Story of Robert E. Lee (Running Time: 38 minutes) — The mere mention of Robert E. Lee conjures up the image of a gray-haired, gray-bearded, gray-suited Confederate General, forever trapped in an 1865 photograph or in a bronze and stone monument. In reality, the Civil War was only four years of his multifaceted, fascinating life, and he was infinitely more complex than the icon he has become. In death, Robert E. Lee still commands attention. He will inevitably fascinate and divide opinion as long as his story continues to unfold. Join HCTV as we explore the controversial figure in “An Evolving Legend: The Story of Robert E. Lee.”

Firehouse Flashbacks [Retired from Broadcast] (Running time: 30 minutes) — Dalmatians, trumpets and wet beards all have something in common. Learn about Henrico’s fire history, traditions and legends as HCTV chronicles the evolution of firefighting in the county.

For the Record: Henrico Circuit Court Clerk’s Office (Running Time: 21 minutes) — The Henrico Circuit Courts Clerk’s Office serves the community in countless ways, including access to public records and assistance with matters related to both civil and criminal cases held in Henrico Circuit Court. The Clerk’s Record Room houses millions of documents. These public records date back to the early years of Henrico County and preserve the history of our community.

Foundations in Time: Henrico’s Architectural Treasures (Running Time: 36 minutes) — Henrico County is home to an amazing variety of architectural styles — from Colonial to Greek revival, art deco to post-modern. In this series, HCTV tours the county’s architectural landscape and meets people who are involved with the design, restoration and recognition of significant structures. You’ll find the story of architecture is just as much about the people who love these great buildings.

Foundations in Time II: More of Henrico’s Architectural Treasures (Running Time: 32 minutes) — In this second edition of Foundations in Time: Henrico’s Architectural Treasures, HCTV visits two very different houses, from very different eras. The early 20th century Mankin Mansion showcases the talents of brickmaker E.T. Mankin, and the Druin-Horner House is a rare survivor from 18th century Henrico. Both are included on the National Register of Historic Places and are recipients of the Historic Preservation Advisory Committee’s Award of Merit for restoration. HCTV explores how the intricate story of our county’s past can be told through historic buildings.

Four Centuries of Conflict and Confusion: The History of Dutch Gap (Running Time: 22 minutes) — The Henrico Circuit Courts Clerk’s Office serves the community in countless ways, including access to public records and assistance with matters related to both civil and criminal cases held in Henrico Circuit Court. The Clerk’s Record Room houses millions of documents. These public records date back to the early years of Henrico County and preserve the history of our community.

Fourth Estate, The: The Story of the Richmond Times-Dispatch (Running Time: 34 minutes) — In 1850 the first edition of The Daily Dispatch was printed providing Richmonders with headline news for a mere penny. More than 150 years and four generations of family publishing later, the Richmond Times-Dispatch continues to roll off the presses 365 days a year. Technology may have changed the way newspapers are printed, but providing local news to central Virginia remains at the heart of this revered local treasure. Join HCTV as we tell the story of The Fourth Estate.

Frozen in Time: The Ruins of the James River Steam Brewery (Running Time: 34 minutes) — The arched cellar entrance of David Yuengling Junior’s once mighty James River Steam Brewery is a portal to an amazing tale that lies buried in a Rocketts Landing hillside, nearly forgotten for a century. The mysterious facade bears no trace of the famous name or the tumultuous times during which an American staple, lager beer, was produced on a massive scale right here in Henrico County. Join HCTV for a journey into the cellars and back in time.

George Henry Moody: A Man to Remember, A Name to Honor (Running Time: 21 minutes) — George Henry Moody held the office of superintendent for 13 of his 38 years with Henrico County Schools, and was honored and lauded in countless ways. He was a humble man, from humble beginnings, and is worthy of remembrance for leaving an indelible mark as an educator, a leader, and as a humanitarian in Henrico County. Join HCTV as we explore the man for whom Moody Middle School was named in George Henry Moody: A Man to Remember, A Name to Honor.

Great War Remembered, The: Henrico’s Story of Service and Support (Running Time: 31 minutes) — On April 6, 1917, the United States formally entered what would eventually come to be known as World War I. Every aspect of our society was affected. The citizens of Henrico County contributed their money, food, energy, and lives to the war effort. Henrico was also the site of a munitions plant staffed by patriotic women in what is now Sandston. Although millions died in combat or from disease, few reminders of the conflict exist today. Through archival film, posters, photographs, and the wartime letters of Meadow Farm’s Sheppard Crump, HCTV takes you back to the forgotten war.

Greetings from Lakeside: Past, Present and Future (Running Time: 33 minutes) — Often described as a little slice of Mayberry, Lakeside is a community with a distinct character, where there are plenty of reminders of “the good old days.” Take a walk down memory lane with HCTV to find out what makes Lakeside so unique, and learn about the forces behind the revitalization of one of the county’s first suburbs and business corridors.

Henrico’s Iron: Ironclad Battles on the James River (Running time: 25 minutes) – The James River in eastern Henrico County serves as a watery grave for three mighty ships from the Civil War. Today, the CSS Richmond, Virginia II and Fredericksburg remain casualties from the James River Squadron and footnotes to America’s struggle to unite its North and South. But during the War, they marked an advanced breed of armored ship. They were Ironclads that forever changed naval combat. HCTV uncovers the untold story of Henrico’s maritime combats during the Civil War in Henrico’s Iron: Ironclad Battles on the James River.

Henrico’s Legacy: Commemorating 400 Years (Running time: 53 minutes) – In 1611, the “city or “town” of Henrico, was established as the second settlement of Virginia. By 1634, Henrico, named for the king’s eldest son Henry, Prince of Wales, would become one of the eight original shires of Virginia. As we celebrate the 400th anniversary of Henrico County, we embrace the history that made us what we are today. Join HCTV as we explore Henrico’s long journey of survival, independence and discovery, and learn about the people and events that shaped the county along the way in Henrico’s Legacy: Commemorating 400 Years.

Henrico’s View of the James River and Kanawha Canal (Running time: 21 minutes) – The mighty James flows through Henrico County like a great provider of wealth and opportunity. Early settlers in the new world saw that shipping goods and services along its waterways would be beneficial. This is a story of triumph and tragedies as we look at historic Henrico experiences along the James River and Kanawha Canal.

Historic Henrico Churches: Windows to Our Past (Running time: 28 minutes) – The story of Henrico’s historic churches began in 1611 when Sir Thomas Dale established a settlement on the edge of the western frontier. From those early days at Henricus to today’s ever-changing communities, historic churches are the windows to our past. Join HCTV as we explore the culture, heritage, and architecture of these celebrated places of worship.

History of Short Pump, The (Running time: 30 minutes) — Short Pump: a crossroads in Henrico County that never had a city hall, never was incorporated, and until recent years, was a quiet, rural community. Who deemed the area “Short Pump”? How has it evolved through the years, and what made it such a special place for residents, businesses, and all who’ve ever passed through?

History of Recreation and Parks, The (Running time: 22 minutes) — For more than four decades, Henrico’s Division of Recreation and Parks has been committed to helping residents pursue good health and good times. With more than 4 million park visitors each year, the division has embraced the responsibility of caring for more than 3,600 acres of parkland, 140 recreational buildings and 35 historic sites. But the Division of Recreation & Parks had humble beginnings, with a few recreational activities organized at local schools. Join HCTV as we learn about the history of Recreation & Parks, and how the division has grown to serve the residents of Henrico.

Hometown Hero: Arthur Ashe, Jr. (Running Time: 28 minutes) — Arthur Ashe, Jr. is known worldwide as a tennis champion, an advocate for education and for his tragic death due to AIDS-related pneumonia as a result of a blood transfusion. Ashe’s legacy and his ties to Central Virginia are further cemented in the Henrico County public school that bears his name, Arthur Ashe, Jr. Elementary. Join HCTV as we explore the man behind the tennis racket, and learn about how he used his notoriety to help the people of Richmond, especially children.

Ideal Place to Live: A History of Sandston, The (Running time: 22 minutes) — The small community of Sandston, nestled in Henrico’s east end, is as unique as the people and the memories that keep it alive and thriving. Escaping from the busy city and into the suburbs, people seeking a quiet and desirable life are at the heart of Sandston’s beginnings. Three wars surround this community’s history and helped shape the Sandston we know today. Join HCTV as we uncover the stories, the people and the way of life in “The Ideal Place to Live: A History of Sandston.”

In the Public Trust: Historic Preservation in Henrico County (Running Time: 23 minutes) — Henrico’s historic preservation efforts include caring for more than 45,000 artifacts and documents, maintaining six museums and more than 30 historic buildings. The Division of Recreation and Parks’ Historic Preservation and Museum Services is the county’s version of the Smithsonian Institute, and the professional staff is dedicated to keeping Henrico’s rich history safe and in tact for future generations to enjoy. Join HCTV as we look at the meticulous work our team of historians, archivists and curators perform every day to bring our history to life.

Inside Innsbrook: Where the West End Started (Running Time: 24 minutes) — The development of Innsbrook Business Park in the early 80s was instrumental in shaping the west end of Henrico County. With more than 850 acres of office space, residential properties and retail, Innsbrook is still a crown jewel in Henrico’s economic assets. With three lakes covering 34 acres, magnificent landscaping and pedestrian-friendly environment, it’s hard to imagine it’s humble beginnings that stemmed from one man with one big idea.

Iron Horse, The: Stories of Central Virginia Railroading (Running Time: 32 minutes) — What is it about the railroad? The music, the movies, the model train sets, the allure of riding the rails . . . people just love trains! HCTV explores the mystique of the railroad, the nostalgia for the steam era and the heyday of passenger rail service. Climb aboard as we introduce you to railroad historians and enthusiasts who are preserving our railroad heritage, and visit a modern day short line railroad that pulls freight through Henrico County.

J.E.B. Stuart: Bold Cavalier (Running time: 35 minutes) — To southerners, James Ewell Brown Stuart is best known as the “Bold Cavalier” of the Confederate Cavalry during the American Civil War, and as Robert E. Lee’s go-to intelligence man. Join HCTV as we follow J.E.B. Stuart’s journey from his boyhood in Ararat, Virginia; his cadet years at West Point; his encounter with abolitionist John Brown at Harpers Ferry; and finally, to his mortal wounding at the Battle of Yellow Tavern in Henrico County.

John Marshall: In the Opinion of the Court (Running Time: 29 minutes) — Chief Justice John Marshall helped shape the future of our nation. From his humble beginnings on the Virginia frontier, Marshall served his country in the American Revolutionary War, became a prominent and respected politician, and served for 34 years as Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. His wisdom, patriotism, and judicial expertise set an example of justice for the world to follow. Learn how Marshall’s leadership cemented the role of the Supreme Court as the Law of the Land in this Central Virginia Biography, John Marshall: In the Opinion of the Court.

John Randolph Tucker: A Heritage of Law (Running time: 17 minutes) — The Tucker name has a legacy of great lawyers and law educators in Virginia dating back to our country’s beginning. John Randolph Tucker continued the family heritage and became a highly respected law practitioner and educator just as his ancestors before him. But it was because of his firm belief in civic betterment that he fought for Henrico County to have its own professional government that gave Tucker a legacy all his own.

Larger than Life: Captain John Cussons (1838-1912) (Running time: 23 minutes) — With a life that spanned from his native England to the American frontier and ultimately Henrico County, John Cussons left us with a colorful image of his spirited adventures and brash personality. But what do we really know about him? Is it possible to separate the truth from the fiction? The man from the legend? Join HCTV as we learn about the fearless pioneer in Larger than Life: Captain John Cussons (1838-1912).

Legacy of Dabbs House, The (Running time: 23 minutes) — Built in the early 1800’s, Dabbs House has been revered as an important landmark in Henrico County. From farmhouse to Robert E. Lee’s headquarters, it’s survived the Civil War and social changes to become a permanent historical fixture. Join HCTV as we examine The Legacy of Dabbs House.

Lewis Ginter: A Quiet Contribution (Running time: 31 minutes) — Lewis Ginter is probably best known in our area for the botanical garden bearing his name. Located in Henrico County, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is but one of the many contributions Ginter made to the Metro Richmond area with the help of his niece, Grace Arents. Although Metro Richmond was a home Ginter adopted, he profoundly changed the landscape and quality of life through his fascinating and diverse business ventures.

Mills E. Godwin: Virginia’s Statesman (Running time: 30 minutes) – Mills Edwin Godwin, Jr., known as Virginia’s Education Governor, was born November 19, 1914 in Nansemond County, Virginia (now the City of Suffolk). During his two terms as governor, Godwin championed the community college system in Virginia, was a key player in the Civil Rights Movement, and implemented the sales tax in the Commonwealth. Godwin remains the only governor in the country who was elected and served his first term as a democrat, and his second as a republican. Join HCTV as we learn more about Godwin through the stories of people who knew him best.

Monticello: Thomas Jefferson’s Dream (Running time: 25 minutes) – Thomas Jefferson’s dream was to build a home in the mountains of Virginia. Throughout the years, his many experiences gave him a wealth of knowledge to make this dream come true. Monticello not only reflects Jefferson’s many interests, but also embodies the spirit of all the people who lived and worked to make this home one of the most famous man-made wonders of Virginia.

Mother Maybelle and The Carter Sisters: The Henrico Years (Running Time: 29 minutes) — The lilting music of the Carter family sprang from the hills of Southwest Virginia, but it flowered in Henrico County. For about six years during the 1940s, Maybelle Carter and her young daughters – Helen, June and Anita – set roots in Central Virginia. In 1946, they saw their popularity explode when they landed a spot with Richmond’s biggest station – WRVA – and its premier stage for hillbilly fun. The family moved to Henrico in 1947, buying a two-story home on what used to be Mountain Road. Join HCTV as we talk to former friends, classmates and fans to learn about Mother Maybelle and the Carter Sisters during their Henrico years.

No Stone Unturned: Cemetery Identification in Henrico County (Running Time: 16 minutes) — Missing pieces of Henrico’s history might be hiding in your own backyard. Since 2003, an effort has been underway to locate, document, and preserve the county’s neglected and forgotten cemeteries. The Cemetery Identification Project is a collaborative effort between the Henrico County Division of Recreation and Parks and the Henrico Historical Society. The initiative combines fieldwork, high-tech mapping, and database organization of the gathered research. HCTV takes you inside the effort to ensure that those who are gone are not forgotten.

Officer’s Duty, An: The History of Henrico Police [Retired from Broadcast] (Running time: 34 minutes) –Law enforcement in Henrico County reaches back to 1676. See how the Division of Police has evolved and developed through the decades as HCTV takes you through the history of communications, vehicles, weapons, crime and fallen officers.

On Air: Early Radio in Central Virginia (Running time: 33 minutes) — From the bygone days of nationwide live performances to modern computer play lists, this nostalgic program will introduce you to the faces of radio that listeners in central Virginia have known for years. HCTV talks to legendary local radio announcer Harvey Hudson, sports broadcasting pioneer Frank Soden and many, many more, about early radio in central Virginia. From the days of Sinatra and Abbott and Costello, to sportscasts from telegraph wire reports, HCTV explores the fascinating world of early broadcasting.

On the Green: Belmont Golf Course (Running time: 25 minutes) –Henrico County’s Belmont Golf Course was first established in 1917 as Hermitage Country Club on Hilliard Road. The golf course hosted such prestigious events as the Valentine Invitational, The Richmond Open, and the 1949 PGA Championship. Henrico purchased the property in 1977 and named the golf course Belmont. The 18-hole course is open to the public, and is one of the area’s finest recreational venues. Join HCTV as we meet the golfers and explore the history, fun and challenges of the course in “On the Green: Belmont Golf Course.”

Opportunity to Reform, An: The Laurel Industrial School and the History of Juvenile Corrections in Henrico (Running time: 33 minutes) — Few people traveling through Laurel on Hungary Road seem to notice that they’re in one of the county’s historic districts, or that they’re passing through the site of the state’s first reformatory. HCTV takes an investigative journey into the dramatic and complex history of the Laurel Industrial School, examines its legacy, and sheds light on its place on the path to modern juvenile justice.

Original Henrico Shire, The [Retired from Broadcast] (Running time: 24 minutes) — In 1611, the “city or “town” of Henrico, was established as the second settlement of Virginia. By 1634, Henrico, named for the king’s eldest son Henry, Prince of Wales, would become one of the eight original shires of Virginia whose borders would incorporate an area from which 13 localities would later be established. On this 400th anniversary of Henrico County, we celebrate by embracing the diversity of our communities and the history that made us what we are today.

Pandemic 1918: A Diary of the Flu (Running time: 28 minutes) — The 1918 flu pandemic brought life to a screeching halt in Central Virginia. Schools and businesses closed, church services were canceled, and people were being quarantined by the thousands. As World War I drew to a close, more than 50 million people worldwide lost their lives to this violent strain of flu. Join HCTV as we chronicle this horrific public health episode through original diaries of a Virginia woman who lived through it.

Promise Fulfilled, The: The History of Henrico County Public Schools [Retired from Broadcast] (Running Time: 31 minutes) — The story of education in Henrico County spans more than four hundred years of growth and change. From the earliest one-room school houses to the classroom of tomorrow, HCTV looks at school life and the ways in which our school system is providing a top-notch education for our students. Quality education is alive and well in Henrico County Public Schools, and the promise is being fulfilled.

Raymond Bennett Pinchbeck: The Good Neighbor (Running time: 28 minutes) – The students at Pinchbeck Elementary School are known as the Rays — for good reason. The school’s name and mascot come from Raymond B. Pinchbeck, a man who served his community locally and nationally. As a Henrico School Board member, a Dean at the University of Richmond and a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy, Pinchbeck brightened lives throughout the community and inspired a character in the popular 1970s television series The Waltons.

Richard Evelyn Byrd: Admiral of the Antarctic (Running time: 42 minutes) – By the early 1950s, Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd had become one of the world’s experts on the Earth’s polar regions. Leading his men into undiscovered icy territory in the name of science and exploration earned him the label of an American hero during the first half of the 20th century. Learn about Virginia’s own extraordinary explorer, and original namesake of Richmond International Airport, in Richard Evelyn Byrd: Admiral of the Antarctic.

Road Through History, A [Retired from Broadcast] (Running time: 32 minutes) – A documentary of the Henrico County Public Works Department, including vintage film circa 1940 as well as modern-day operations.

Safely Rest: The Saga of Taps, An American Bugle Call (Running time: 27 minutes) – Taps, the unmistakable bugle melody that has signaled day’s end for our military for more than 150 years, is perhaps best known as a song of mourning and as the final tribute at funerals for service members. While the twenty-four deceptively simple notes are easily recognizable, their origin is much more complex. Join HCTV for a musical journey that spans the Eastern Henrico Civil War battles in the summer of 1862, and the creation of Taps at Berkeley Plantation soon thereafter, to Arlington National Cemetery where it is played an average of thirty times a day.

Saving Lives: The History of Henrico’s Rescue Squads (Running time: 24 minutes) — Since 1951, Henrico County has offered free emergency rescue services to our residents. What began as a strictly volunteer effort has evolved into a modernized, cohesive paramedic and advanced emergency medical support unit operated by the Division of Fire. The mission to save lives has always been the driving factor.

Southern Man of Mystery: Edgar Allan Poe (Running time: 37 minutes) — This premiere edition of Central Virginia Biographies takes you into the world of “America’s Shakespeare,” Edgar Allan Poe. The brilliant but troubled writer is credited with mastering the genre of science fiction, detective fiction, and the horror story, in addition to creating mesmerizing poetry and establishing the format of the short story. The legendary author of The Raven, The Tell-Tale Heart and The Fall of the House of Usher grew up in Richmond, and considered himself a Virginian wherever his travels led him. Take a poetic journey back in time with HCTV’s Southern Man of Mystery: Edgar Allan Poe.

State of Mind, A: The History of the Glen Allen Community (Running time: 29 minutes) — Where is Glen Allen? Where isn’t it? Geographically, Glen Allen stretches throughout northwestern Henrico County, and parts of the community extend into Goochland and Hanover counties. While Glen Allen might be considered just another bedroom community in the suburbs of Henrico, it’s rich history, rural landscape and colorful lifelong residents define the very foundation of this community. Join HCTV as we explore the people, their stories and times gone by in A State of Mind: The History of the Glen Allen Community.

Story of Maude F. Trevvett, The: A Lifetime of Teaching (Running time: 21 minutes) — Maude F. Trevvett was a primary teacher in Henrico County Public Schools for 46 years. At age nine she and her family emigrated from Leicester, England and settled in the village of Glen Allen. Trevvett began her teaching career in 1892 at Yellow Tavern School, followed by Laurel, and eventually Glen Allen School. She taught as many as three generations of Henrico students and left a permanent mark on the Glen Allen area. In 1958, Henrico officials acknowledged her dedication to Henrico by naming a new school in the Brookland district “Maude Trevvett Elementary School.”

Strumming up the Past: Henrico’s Bluegrass Music (Running time: 24 minutes) — Bluegrass represents a distinctly American style of music, a beautiful blend of old-timey, Celtic, gospel, country and blues. Henrico County is keeping the music alive by organizing a bluegrass jam each month at Dorey Park. If you’ve stood before the microphone and or clapped from the audience, you know there’s something about bluegrass that tugs on your soul.

Taking Flight: Stories of Early Virginia Aviation (Running time: 53 minutes) — Join us as we visit with pilots of the open-cockpit biplanes and explore aviation from 1864-1940 in this living history documentary.

Taking Flight: Stories of Modern Virginia Aviation (Running Time: 51 minutes) — Evolution of flight has taken more than a century. Throughout the years, many of the discoveries made that have shaped the industry have come from one small corner of the world. From streamlining the early warbirds of World War II, to improving the capabilities of today’s supersonic stealth fighters, the story of modern aviation cannot be told without the pilots, researchers and enthusiasts right here in Virginia. Join HCTV as we lead you through aircraft innovation in Taking Flight: Stories of Modern Virginia Aviation.

Taking to the Sky: First Ladies of Aviation (Running Time: 26 minutes) — In 1903, the Wright Brothers harnessed the mystery of flight. Male-dominated American aviators began to explore the skies and capture the imagination. But before long, women stepped forward with their own spirit of adventure. Join HCTV as we meet Martha C. West, Genevieve Krimm Orange and Maude “Maxine” Walker who found their passion for flying and a desire to go beyond the traditional roles expected of women.

Tough Choices: The County Manager Form of Government (Running time: 36 minutes) — HCTV brings you the inside story of the men who have managed Henrico since 1934. Their stories tell us why the County Manager Form of Government has become the benchmark in local communities.

Under the Lights: Richmond International Raceway [Retired from Broadcast] (Running time: 22 minutes) — From the first dirt track race in 1946 to today’s unique three-quarter mile speedway, Richmond International Raceway has evolved into one of the most popular auto racing tracks in the country. HCTV talks to Jeff Gordon, Hermie Sadler, Bill France Jr. and others on why drivers and fans alike love RIR! You’ll see original footage from the early 50s through the fast-paced action of today.

Until the Cows Come Home: A History of Dairy Farming in Henrico County, Virginia (Running time: 51 minutes) — Henrico County once supplied milk for much of the Richmond Area, and dairy farms were a way of life. The HCTV team shares stories of joys and days-gone-by in this fascinating tale of cows and family owned farms.

Virginia Estelle Randolph: Pioneer Educator (Running time: 29 minutes) — Virginia Estelle Randolph was a pioneer educator in Henrico County during the 19th and 20th centuries. Her innovative ideas and vocational curriculum termed “The Henrico Plan” was adopted throughout the south and internationally. Randolph made remarkable strides in African-American education during an unsettled time in our history. Join HCTV as we look inside the life of Virginia Estelle Randolph, and learn how her legacy lives on today.

Virginia: The Mother of Presidents (Running time: 41 minutes) — Virginia is known as the Mother of Presidents for good reason: more United States presidents hail from this great state than any other. Virginia has produced eight U.S. presidents, including Washington, Jefferson, Monroe, Harrison, Tyler, Taylor and Wilson. Each played a vital role in the formation of our country and our democratic form of government. These insightful and experienced leaders guided our country through times of war and peace, and helped shape the United States of America.

Voices from Mountain Road: The Historic Mountain Road Corridor [Retired from Broadcast] (Running time: 36 minutes) — The history of Henrico County is filled with stories of dreams, intrigue, ambition and courage — many of which happened in the historic Mountain Road corridor. See these stories come to life, and learn about the remarkable Virginians who changed the course of American history.

Welcome to Dabbs House (Running Time: 8 minutes) — Henrico’s historic Dabbs House has been restored and is now open to the public for an inside look at this significant national landmark. The structure has been used for many diverse purposes through its lifetime, including an antebellum farmhouse, Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s headquarters, an alms house, Henrico police headquarters and an office building. Visitors will learn fascinating stories about the Dabbs House, and discover why it has stood the test of time.

Welcome to Meadow Farm Museum (Running Time: 10 minutes) — The history of the rolling fields and grassy pastures of Meadow Farm is a story of land and people. It stretches over seven generations of the Sheppard family, tracing back to Virginia’s earliest days and beyond. Land that was once inhabited by the Monacan Indians has been host to a thriving agricultural farm, an unsuccessful slave revolt by Gabriel Prosser, the doorstep to a 13 mile long Union march to the battle of Yellow Tavern, and eventually a generous gift by the Crump family as a historical museum and park to the residents of Henrico County.

When the Clock Strikes Twelve: New Year’s Traditions (Running time: 29 minutes)

Remember, reflect, resolve, renew — our New Year’s traditions help us do all of these things. But before you can have the tradition, you need to have the New Year. Why do we celebrate the first of January? And how did all of these traditions get started? From Auld Lang Syne and champagne toasts, to Times Square, black-eyed peas and Pasadena’s Rose Bowl, learn about all things New Year in HCTV’s When the Clock Strikes Twelve: New Year’s Traditions.

Will of the People, The: The Evolution of American Voting and Elections (Running Time: 27 minutes) — Virginia is the birthplace of America’s unique democracy, which has evolved and improved from colonial times through today. Discover the history of our democratic process in The Will of the People, a compelling look at the suffrage movements of women and minorities, as well as advancements in ballot casting technology and campaigning methods.