Henrico County Television (HCTV) programming is now available through Comcast’s Video On Demand service. To access HCTV programs, select the “Get Local” folder, followed by “Government,” and finally “Access Henrico.” Video On Demand allows our Comcast cable subscribers to choose which HCTV program they want to watch and when they want to watch it. Approximately 25 programs are available at one time. We change the program line-up monthly.

You may also request a DVD of an HCTV program by calling Public Relations & Media Services at 501-4257.

Alphabetical list of all HCTV programs.
Chronological list of all HCTV programs.
View HCTV programs by subject.
View select HCTV programs online.

 

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Watch our message board between scheduled programming every day for current Henrico events, services and public meeting information.

Cashell Donahoe: A Gentleman and a Scholar (18 mins)

Cashell Donahoe left an indelible mark on Henrico County, having served as assistant superintendent of schools from 1956 until 1974. But Donahoe was more than a teacher and an administrator. He was a mountain of a man, with an abiding faith, a commitment to others and a thirst for knowledge. Join HCTV as we examine the life of Cashell Donahoe: A Gentleman and a Scholar.

Curtain Call: A History of the Henrico Theatre (25 mins)

When it opened its doors in 1938, the Henrico Theatre was described as a “big city temple of entertainment set in beautiful rural surroundings.” A classic example of art-deco architecture, the theatre was the crown jewel of Highland Springs. After years of successes and changes of ownership, the Henrico Theatre closed its doors— until Henrico County purchased the property in 1999. Join HCTV as we reveal the story behind the theatre, follow the extensive renovation process and learn how it has become a historic landmark in the county.

Taking Flight: Stories of Modern Virginia Aviation (51 mins)

When it opened its doors in 1938, the Henrico Theatre was described as a “big city temple of entertainment set in beautiful rural surroundings.” A classic example of art-deco architecture, the theatre was the crown jewel of Highland Springs. After years of successes and changes of ownership, the Henrico Theatre closed its doors— until Henrico County purchased the property in 1999. Join HCTV as we reveal the story behind the theatre, follow the extensive renovation process and learn how it has become a historic landmark in the county.

Henrico’s View of the James River and Kanawha Canal (21 mins)

The mighty James flows through Henrico County like a great provider of wealth and opportunity. Early settlers in the new world saw that shipping goods and services along its waterways would be beneficial. This is a story of triumph and tragedies as we look at historic Henrico experiences along the James River and Kanawha Canal.

Jackson Davis: Catalyst for Educational Equality (22 mins)

Jackson Davis made his name as an education reformer. He travelled with his camera, taking thousands of photographs documenting the often-poor condition of African-American education in the South during the first half of the 20th century. These stark images and Davis’ meticulous notes helped attract private investment that gradually lifted rural communities still suffering from the Civil War. While his service to Henrico lasted only a few years, Davis’ legacy continues. In 1962, the School Board opened Jackson Davis Elementary honoring the catalyst for educational equality.

Larger than Life: Captain John Cussons (1838-1912) (23 mins)

With a life that spanned from his native England to the American frontier and ultimately Henrico County, John Cussons left us with a colorful image of his spirited adventures and brash personality. But what do we really know about him? Is it possible to separate the truth from the fiction? The man from the legend? Join HCTV as we learn about the fearless pioneer in Larger than Life: Captain John Cussons (1838-1912).

Standing Tall: Native Trees of Henrico County (25 mins)

From majestic oaks to loblolly pines, the native trees of Henrico not only enhance the natural beauty of the county and provide a habitat for animals, they play a vital part in the ecology of our environment. Join HCTV as we learn about the variety of native trees in our area and the role they play in the cycle of life.

Never Forget: Janice Johnson Missing Person Cold Case (15 mins)

On November 1, 2001 Janice Johnson, a wife and mother of three children, went missing. While Police located her abandoned car several days later, no other evidence has surfaced — no crime scene, no body, no witnesses. In the years that have since passed, Henrico County Cold Case detectives have worked tirelessly to link a suspect to Janice’s disappearance, but they still need that one tip, or one phone call to help solve the mystery of what happened to Janice Johnson. Never Forget.

Inside Henrico: Spring 2016 (TBD mins)
This edition of Inside Henrico feature packages include:

  • New Police Chief
  • Crestview Firehouse 10 Grand Opening
  • Sidewalks
  • Outdoor Grill Safety
  • Mosquitos/Zika Virus

Birds of the James (26 mins)

We’ve all marveled at the majesty of Bald Eagles, Ospreys, Double-Crested Cormorants, and Great Blue Herons — truly a natural resource to behold. What most people don’t realize is that these beautiful river birds reside right here at home along the James. Join HCTV as we get up close to the birds of the James River, and learn how they are part of the wonderful natural environment that surrounds us.

Learning the Henrico Way: Inside the County’s Internship Program (18 mins)

The lessons learned by students in the classroom are important building blocks for a career after graduation, but experience gained after the school bell rings is irreplaceable. Whether in high school or college, internships prepare students for the workforce in ways a textbook can’t. Join HCTV as we explore Henrico’s internship program and see how our future leaders are learning the Henrico Way.

Airwaves of Yesteryear: Early Television in Central Virginia (30 mins)

On April 22, 1948 the very first television broadcast south of our nation’s capital happened right here in Central Virginia. WTVR began a legacy of quality local programming, which was soon followed by WXEX and WRVA. These early television pioneers brought us local favorites including Dandy Doodle, Sailor Bob and Shock Theatre. Join HCTV as we celebrate more than 60 years of community programming and look at how this new form of entertainment changed our lives forever in Airwaves of Yesteryear: Early Television in Central Virginia.

Paving Ahead: Building & Maintaining Roads in Henrico County (14 mins)

Henrico’s Public Works Department maintains more than 3,400 lane miles of roadways, typically resurfacing or repaving about 150 miles of roads each year. Because our crews survey the roads year round and prioritize paving work, our residents enjoy the ability to drive throughout the county on safe, well-maintained roadways. Join us as HCTV explores how the process works and what’s involved in Paving Ahead: Building & Maintaining Roads in Henrico County.

Between The Lines: How Reconstruction Redrew The Map of Henrico (22 mins)

You may know which magisterial district you live in, but do you know how that district came to be, or why its boundaries are where they are? The reasons are far more interesting and complex than you may think. Our districts and our Board of Supervisors structure of governance can trace their roots back to the turbulent years following the Civil War, known as the Reconstruction Period, and have been evolving with the times ever since.

Crystal Clear: Henrico County Water Reclamation Facility (21 mins)

Each time we do a load of laundry, take a shower, flush the toilet or wash our hands, we produce wastewater that seems to magically disappear through unseen pipes. In fact, in Henrico County, we produce more than 42 million gallons of wastewater every day. This wastewater must be cleaned, treated and prepared before reentering our environment through the James River. Join HCTV as we tour the high tech (if sometimes smelly) Water Reclamation Facility where this fascinating process takes place. From the natural use of nutrient eating organisms to the multi-step treatment process, Henrico’s Water Reclamation Facility makes sure the water returned to the James is crystal clear.

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